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-3

My nephew use to bit my daughter really bad for stupid things or when he had a tantrum. One day he almost killed her with iron bar, luckily my mum had time to stop his attack. His mum didn't said anything about his behave and never bothered, then, I had to stand up. I called him in private and said how much I loved my daughter and also him, but if he touch ...


0

If it happens a lot it is abusive. For now if it is going on a lot. Keep him away more often from his cousins and then we he is about four, get him into self defense and also look on the internet like youtube for some kid self defense but make sure he does not learn something that can seriously injure another child. For now you perhaps should keep him away ...


3

After seeing a few of these answers, I'm developing "steps" that I would take in these situations. See what you think. Assess the situation. Try to figure out exactly what is prompting the actions of the child in question. Get the whole story. A lot of times, a child will just live in a family where rambunctious play is a part of everyday life and he ...


6

Our job as parents is to equip our children to succeed as an adult. By shielding your child from those situations and talking to the parents, you are doing your child a disservice. Instead, talk to your little ones and help them process the emotions of the moment when that happened. Ask them things like, "was that surprising", "what did you feel when he did ...


5

"Little monster" seems a bit harsh. You don't yet know for sure that your children might not pass through an unfortunate or aggressive phase in a year or two. (My son was very aggressive around that age, and it wasn't because we thought it was OK, or because we weren't taking steps to address the issue.) With that said, I think it's entirely appropriate ...


3

I only complain to other parents if the kids are really small < 4 or the kids don't speak my language. Kids aren't pet dogs, they are able to communicate. They usually like being respected as independent persons and it is more unusual getting an advice from a foreigner than from their own parents. I try to get into a friendly dialogue with the kid. "...


2

Your protective instincts and concerns about modeling for your boys are right on-the-money, I'd say. As are your concerns about over-reacting. But there is a lot of middle ground here. All the wordiness starting with "Excuse me, ... but..." is not going to mean anything to this age group though (think adult-speak in Charlie Brown specials: wahhh wahh, wahhh ...


0

The only time you should address a stranger's child with complaints is if they are doing something that poses an immediate danger to themselves or others. If they are pestering your children, the best thing to do is remove your children and yourself from their vicinity. If that isn't reasonable, you should approach whoever is in charge of the child and only ...



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