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5

Talk to the school. They should have an anti-bullying policy. Get it and insist that they apply it in this case. Write to the teachers. Identify the specific hurtful behaviours being used and insist that they are stamped on. The only way to stop this is to make it clear to the bullies that their behaviour will not be tolerated. Bullying is child abuse, no ...


5

This has to be one of the most painful parts of parenting. It's good that the teachers are contacting you**; having Cain's parents sit in, though, while very important for Cain and his parents, is not much of an action plan. What are the school's written policies? All schools should have one in place; even in preschool. Ask to read it. Bullying often ...


3

Try roleplaying with a toy or a doll. Play nursery, have a doll be her, one for the caregiver, a few "friends"... and then suddenly one friend is angry! Oh no, what happens? Kids often don't (want to) tell things, but when playing, use a mix of both fantasy and their own experiences to create situations. Ask follow up questions: why did the doll do that? ...


3

Try focusing a conversation or two around making her relaxed about the subject. She might be worried about the social consequences of "telling", backlash, maybe she actually likes the child who did it and they made up, who knows. You'll have to not just tell her it will be ok, but make her feel safe to tell you what she's worried about. This has to be ...


3

Ouch. This is difficult. First, the good points: you have the school on your side, they are responding appropriately, and it sounds like Cain is being progressed through a proper disciplinary sequence. You might ask the school about that: they should have a written policy. I understand that you want to send the right messages to your son. I would suggest ...


2

I heard a tip the other day that is similar to the role-playing idea. Make it a game, asking silly questions about the people in their class. Have one of the questions be something like "If aliens came down and took one person away from your class, who would you have them take?" Phrasing things in silly ways like that could help kids open up, because it's ...


2

Good job mom for recognizing this behavior while she's so young! I want to suggest that communication about bulling is key. Schools are doing a lot of seminars and such with the rise in school violence but shes probably a bit young for that. I did a quick amazon search and found a lots of children's books about being yourself, teasing vs bullying and ...


1

Honestly, it sounds to me that you're largely doing the right things already. Getting him out of the situation (Time outs), re-engaging his empathy for his cousin (hugging afterwards), and giving him alternate ways to express his frustration (hitting the pillow) are exactly the same three steps we do with our (very aggressive) four year old - not quite the ...


1

If he loves giving a hug after hitting her then you could be accidentally reinforcing the bad behavior. I'd keep with time out instead. It helps to teach him other ways to show that something is "his". Our daycare really emphasizes that the kids need to say "mine mine" when another child tries to take their toy. It gives them a way to express themselves. ...



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