Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

39

It seems to me that being shouted at is likely to make any child cry, particularly by an older child. Shouting is not nice, and intimidating particularly from an older child. Door knocking i've not seen before, but if door knocking includes fairly loud knocking, it could also be a bit disturbing. More likely to me, he's concerned about some change when ...


30

When confronted with these issues for the first time, we asked ourselves these questions: Can we afford to have everything all our peers have? If not, when and how did we learn to not to let this bring us down? Do we calculate our self-esteem depending on whether we can buy the same things our peers do? Seeing some of the things their peers have, do we ...


21

Like the others, I disagree that you should buying your child "everything". But I feel there is an important distinction other answers don't bring to the point, although some skirt it. When your children asks for something "everybody has", ask yourself: is it a status symbol, or a tool prerequisite for participating in an activity common among its peers? ...


17

I think that money is not the most important factor here. I think that the reason the children usually have these costly toys (and I mean toys, since most kids do little more than play on them) like smartphones, laptops, tablets, PSPs, etc. is not because their parents care about them; it's often because they actually neglect them. The device is not ...


16

Being brave is not the absence of fear, it is doing the right thing even though you are afraid. Fear is good, it is based off of natural preservation instincts and can warn of danger. You need to teach him about the things that are more important than self preservation: Teach him about principles and standing for them, Teach him about chivalry, teach him ...


10

As a young adult (19) I think it would be good for me to input in this conversation as a child of this generation. I would first like to explain my background. My parents were/are pretty low income (£10,000 a year) so during school i often did not have a lot of what the other kids had. For example my trainers weren't the newest, it took 2 years after the ...


9

When I first read this question, the first word that came to my mind was bullying. You're in a kind of "damned if you do, damned if you don't" position here, and you need to choose 1) what's really best for your kids, and 2) what heartache you want to face. First, do you have the means, and live a lifestyle, that allows you to give your child everything ...


8

Realistically, you can't. Your son is four. A four year old doesn't have the brain development for conflict resolution entailing the use of carefully applied physical force. Your son doesn't need to learn how to physically defend himself at this age, or learn to physically deter aggressors. He needs to learn that he can trust the adults charged with his ...


6

I think there are lots of possible responses and the one that you choose depends on your values and ability to do the response fully. When I was bullied at school, although I was doing karate at the time, an aggressive response was just not me. Taking your son's character into consideration is therefore important. Here are some ideas: Give your son some ...


5

You use the same approach you would use for just about any other "how to protect my children" question. Step 1: educate yourself. The first thing you have to do is educate yourself. What does your child do online, and where are the risks they're going to face? If you have a good relationship with your child, you can ask them about it directly. You can ...


5

Unfortunately a lot of the Internet is a 'Wild West' environment - you cannot completely prevent cyber bullying. That said, there are a number of options which can help. I'm guessing you are not a parent, but this topic is likely to be of interest to parents and children alike. Facebook has a specific anti-cyber-bullying team that you can report incidents ...


5

Standing up for yourself doesn't have to involve violence - and certainly in most cases should not. I suppose if I were attacked by someone and had literally no viable alternative, I would fight back, but in general I would almost always have a viable alternative. That's the key for children in this kind of situation. You should teach him to stand up for ...


5

Fearlessness is basically stupidity. You can be fearless only if you are stupid enough not to be able to realize the consequences of a serious action or danger. Strength is doing what needs to be done or what is right, DESPITE fear, DESPITE being able to realize the potential grave consequences of an action which you may have to take or an event which you ...


4

I don't think you should worry too much at this stage. It doesn't seem to me that a child's fears at this age are likely to reflect how their personality will turn out when they get older. It sounds like a lot of your son's fears may be related to his imagination and it can be a good thing that he has a good imagination. My youngest brother used to come up ...


3

Your child is going to learn how to face the world based on how you face the world. For example, did you buy an iPad because everyone else has one or because it was a tool to use? Do you buy a particular shirt because it has a logo on it or because that was an appropriate shirt? Do you buy a particular pair of shoes because they say "Nike" or because ...


3

The key is to make independent evaluations of the value to your child. What other parents are buying or giving in on shouldn't be your deciding factor at all. Marketing is driven by peer pressure and the attitude of "keeping up with the Joneses" will teach your children bad financial practices and set them up for an inability to succeed well in life as it ...


3

A bully is a tyrant in training. Dealing with a bully is as challenging as dealing with a tyrant -- none of us are born with the skills to handle them well. When I was about 7yo, I asked my mom, "Mommy, why do kids act one way at school and another way when they are not at school... I am me wherever I am?" The question fell on confused ears as it does for ...


3

My son is also 2 years old, and is occasionally frightened by unexpected things. For instance, he loves to push all the buttons on toys in stores, especially on trucks and cars. However, some of them are very loud and/or have motorized parts. Like your son, he'll sometimes be afraid of them. He'll come to us and hug our legs, or back off from the toy and ...


1

If the fear is caused by noise or strangers it should go away as he becomes older. A typical twenty-four month old child should be afraid of loud noises and strangers. It would be unusual if he wasn't. Here's a visual showing the fears of young children over time. The left side shows fears that decrease over time and the right side shows fears that ...


1

We've had good results telling our three year old to put the hands in front of her (not really pushing but creating a physical distance between her and and aggressor) and yelling loudly "no" (mostly to alert the adults nearby).


1

Well its not possible for a parent to be around a 2.5 year kid all the time. Like my son he goes to school. Since there are other kids playing around it is possible for the child attender to lose control for may be few seconds and that is enough for a push or pinch. Here neither my child is wrong neither the other child because they are learning and self ...


1

This is perfectly normal and common for a 2 year old. Don't worry about it. He'll get more confidence as he gets a bit older, and discovers all the new things he can do. What you should avoid is trying to push him to do things he's frightened of. This will have the opposite effect to what you're trying to achieve. It's perfectly normal that he would cry if ...


1

@Joe's answer is excellent but I believe that the real question here lies more in how to teach a child when violence is unacceptable vs. when it may be ok. I believe that it comes down to the motivations behind the violence. Using violence out of frustration or anger or a desire to have power over others is wrong. Being the aggressor or instigator of a ...


1

You are not really giving us all the information we need, ages, is the nieces parent around, so I will do the best with what little information was given. do you live with your niece? When you say our room, does that mean his room? Your son is being bullied by an older child, you need to talk to her mother and advise her that she needs to teach her child ...


1

In the delivery room where I had my babies, there was a sign; "You don't need to rear kids, they just copy everything you do." (Without making a judgement on this) if you are the sort of person to whom possession of status symbols is important, then your kids will be too. Period. If you can say "I don't need a new X because the old X is still working", ...


1

The question Joe linked has your answer. In short, the cost of bullying needs to outweigh the benefits the other child gets. Help your daughter come up with strategies that will make bullying not worth it for the bully to continue in her behavior. Doing that at 2 will be a bit harder, because their verbal repartee is not what it will be in a few years. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible