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13

I hear a couple different things here, so I will approach them 1 at a time. First, your girl... News flash: ready? She's 3. 3 year olds don't know much about anything, let alone how to effectively defend themselves to a bully. So that's where parents come in. Most adults don't even know how to effectively handle a bully. She likely can't even remember ...


10

His classmates are rewarded by the spectacle of his tantrums as well as the group feeling of having a common target. Unless he can control the tantrums and ignore all taunts, I fear the only option is to change his environment to a more welcoming one. That may mean changing schools or getting ALL the parents to make sure their children behave.


5

That's pretty common behavior at age three and a half. I would hesitate to call it "overly" sensitive at this point. At any rate, it's not disliking being touched on the shoulder that's the problem, it's the reaction, so teach the reaction you want him to have and make him repeat it. It also helps to ask if their natural reaction is having the desired ...


4

You use the same approach you would use for just about any other "how to protect my children" question. Step 1: educate yourself. The first thing you have to do is educate yourself. What does your child do online, and where are the risks they're going to face? If you have a good relationship with your child, you can ask them about it directly. You can ...


4

Unfortunately a lot of the Internet is a 'Wild West' environment - you cannot completely prevent cyber bullying. That said, there are a number of options which can help. I'm guessing you are not a parent, but this topic is likely to be of interest to parents and children alike. Facebook has a specific anti-cyber-bullying team that you can report incidents ...


3

It's hard to give a definite solution. If you can subtly get on to the subject (maybe she'll bring it up) of this problem, perhaps advise your daughter to shout 'go away' when someone does something like that. I did advise my son to do that, and admittedly he got a little carried away with it, but I found it better than not doing anything. As for ...


3

Without knowing anything else about your son - have a look in to "Sensory Integration". Some kids can be overloaded with sensory input, and have a hard time dealing with it. At the very least it could provide you with some insight in to his world. If it seems to fit together you might want to get help on it - here in Canada we have the Child Development ...


3

Very difficult subject... Tackle the Problem from the Inside It's the most effective, and the point you have the most impact on. It sounds possible zen and overreaching, but the child need inner-strength, and, above all, inner-peace. It's going to be very difficult, but someone would need to help the child to be more passive about the assaults and not ...


1

The question Joe linked has your answer. In short, the cost of bullying needs to outweigh the benefits the other child gets. Help your daughter come up with strategies that will make bullying not worth it for the bully to continue in her behavior. Doing that at 2 will be a bit harder, because their verbal repartee is not what it will be in a few years. ...



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