Hot answers tagged

6

Our job as parents is to equip our children to succeed as an adult. By shielding your child from those situations and talking to the parents, you are doing your child a disservice. Instead, talk to your little ones and help them process the emotions of the moment when that happened. Ask them things like, "was that surprising", "what did you feel when he did ...


5

"Little monster" seems a bit harsh. You don't yet know for sure that your children might not pass through an unfortunate or aggressive phase in a year or two. (My son was very aggressive around that age, and it wasn't because we thought it was OK, or because we weren't taking steps to address the issue.) With that said, I think it's entirely appropriate ...


3

After seeing a few of these answers, I'm developing "steps" that I would take in these situations. See what you think. Assess the situation. Try to figure out exactly what is prompting the actions of the child in question. Get the whole story. A lot of times, a child will just live in a family where rambunctious play is a part of everyday life and he ...


3

I only complain to other parents if the kids are really small < 4 or the kids don't speak my language. Kids aren't pet dogs, they are able to communicate. They usually like being respected as independent persons and it is more unusual getting an advice from a foreigner than from their own parents. I try to get into a friendly dialogue with the kid. "...


2

Your protective instincts and concerns about modeling for your boys are right on-the-money, I'd say. As are your concerns about over-reacting. But there is a lot of middle ground here. All the wordiness starting with "Excuse me, ... but..." is not going to mean anything to this age group though (think adult-speak in Charlie Brown specials: wahhh wahh, wahhh ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible