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28

Our daughter displayed many of the same behaviors your cite and we had to resort to having one parent hold her while the other brushed her teeth properly. What we found helpful, though, was to have the parent brushing the teeth to say the vowels aloud - Aaaaaa, Eeeeeeeeee, Iiiiiiiiiii, Ooooooooooo, Uuuuuuuuuuu, and sometimes Yyyyyyyyyyyyyy - and to encourage ...


14

They have to have the physically and mental capacity to continually brush all of their teeth for about 3 minutes (a number I've been told is good by many dentists). If he's not able to get all the teeth, front and back, then what we have done with our kids is to set a timer for 1-2 minutes and let them brush, then have a parent brush for 1-2 minutes. One ...


14

Sometimes some strange trick will work. Our son started to accept his teeth being brushed when he got to hold a hand mirror and watch it from there. He sometimes still asks for the mirror though he's mostly forgotten about it, but lets brush her teeth normally.


12

We played dentist with our kids. First I would welcome them like my dentist does, "Hello Mr. G! My name is Dr. G. and I'll be your dentist today. Is there anything I need to know before we begin?" I was surprised at how often my kids had canker sores that I wouldn't have known about otherwise. Then they would lie down in my lap (sometimes this was easier ...


10

Teeth require brushing. If there are any teeth at all, they need to be brushed. Brushing early on helps get the habit in place - there's no reason to wait with that. Even better, by beginning this early, there's less "risk" from those days where you give up for various reasons.


9

We started this as soon as he had a few teeth (round about 12 months in our sons case) and found it easier to make it fun, Essentially one of either my wife and I clean our teeth with him, we clean his teeth then let him hold the brush and "attempt" to clean his own too (he hasn't quite got the hang of this bit at 16 months :) ) Once done we ask him to let ...


8

Both of ours went through a stage like this (in fact number two is still going through it). Lighten up - if you don't get a perfect brush in EVERY day, nothing bad is going to happen Make sure it really is about the teeth and not power struggles Try a mixed approach - if one idea works for you, great, but have a whole load of others ready! Making a game ...


8

A few other ideas: Interesting toothbrush and other gear: we've tried half a dozen, and the electric one works the best. I think you have to be extra gentle though to make sure it doesn't hurt. I like user339's advice about trying a mouth mirror. Go shopping with your toddler to pick out his equipment. Build on what he does understand: my mom taught my ...


7

There are two most likely scenarios here: Your child may have oral-sensory issues. I mention this possibility first not because it's more likely (it's not) than the latter, but because you want to be at least reasonably sure that it is not the case before you push the issue. Children with moderate-to-severe oral sensory issues tend (in my experience) to ...


7

As a speech language pathologist, I often treat children with oral motor, feeding and sensory integration disorders. For these children, I encourage caregivers to use the electric toothbrush to promote oral sensory awareness/development and provide intense stimulation to their central nervous system. These children usually crave sensory input and they ...


7

Our dentist recommends that brushing starts as soon as solid food is introduced. There are two types of baby toothbrushes: those that you slip over a finger (better for when they don't have teeth, 'cause they're ideal for gums) and specially-sized infant toothbrushes with handles appropriately designed for small hands to grip. There's also infant ...


6

The thing that in my experience helps the most is letting the child brush your teeth while you brush theirs. It makes brushing fun for the kid - might not be as fun for you as you try to cope, but a) it gives the child an active role instead of just standing around with open mouth; b) it shows trust; c) it makes the time pass more quickly for the child; d) ...


6

Our daughter was the same with the sucking and chewing but one trick we use that has worked really well is one parent brushing at the same time while the other parent is the 'judge' and seeing who can make the loudest noise while smiling and brushing up and down/ side to side, Once it became a game with a bit of competition she happily stands there brushing ...


5

I'm a dental hygienist and I have used an electric tb with my little dude from the start. He loves the vibration on his teething gumline. He just turned one and has 4 teeth. The key is to do what works for your individual child.


4

We got the MOST effective improvement in our son's brushing habits by moving away from the "kids tooth paste" in bubble-gum-tooti-fruiti-cherry-so-sweet-you-wanna-puke flavor to just plain old non-flouridated baking soda tooth paste. He still wants to suck on it a little bit, and chews to some extent on the bristles, but that one change alone was like a ...


4

We have a toothbrushing song that I made up. It's a pretty stupid song, but he's small and doesn't care. I start the song as I brush his teeth and then stop sing at some point in the song and let him say the next word then start singing again. I do this a few times throughout the song. It keeps him engaged. Sometimes I'll even say the wrong word in the ...


4

We started brushing our son's teeth once he got them out, although he was not into it the thought we had was getting him used to it early. Many things kids have can have sugar, or cause decay, so even with baby teeth you still want to have a clean mouth. Problem is whether or not your son will allow you to brush.


4

Not sure if they are still around (ask your dentist), but when I was young I remember there were some pills which you could shew after brushing. These pills stained badly / un-brushed areas bright red. You could let your kid brush their teeth, chew the pill, check with them in the mirror for red spots and fix those until the kid gets it right on the first ...


4

Having your teeth brushed by someone else isn't nice. It's invasive. Realizing that much is a good start. The right brushes, being aware of when and where your child is teething and gentleness all help, but it's unlikely to ever be an entirely enjoyable process. The usual combination of patience, consistency and self control comes into play too. Getting ...


4

Toddlers like to do what their parents do. So when it is time to brush the baby's teeth, also brush your own. Put toothpaste on her brush, give it to her, and get to work with your own brush on your own mouth. Show the gestures you are making. Encourage her to do just as you are doing - exaggerate your movements as you do the back, the front, the back on ...


3

After some unhappy struggles, mostly ending in him lying pinned in my lap while I forcibly brushed them :-( I realised it was too stressful for us both and so tried putting some toothpaste on his and my brushes, giving him my toothbrush to do my teeth whilst brushing his. It worked like magic. He is too busy brushing mine to complain and at the same time ...


3

Under 8yo you need to brush for them. We used to have a chair just outside the bathroom and sung the 'kingdom of teeth song' when it was time for teeth brushing, basically a loudly renditioned da da da ta da of the lord of the rings theme song. Following that I would tell a story about the kingdom of teeth making up something about a mythical land of ...


3

You can start using them as soon as you think your kids will understand how to use them. There isn't anything inherently good or bad about using an electric toothbrush at any age as long as the child understands how to use it to get their mouth clean. That's the trick. What I like about the electrics is that you can get ones with timers so you can teach your ...


3

This might make your life simpler (or possibly more worrying, considering how long you may have been doing this wrong): You're supposed to brush before meals. It's technically harmful to brush immediately after, as it removes acid softened enamel. Brushing removes plaque, not food, so you actually want to brush the plaque off before eating, as it ...


2

I'd go crazy too having someone brush my teeth. ;) I can only recommend to relax. Brush yours and let him find his way to do it. It will come if you can show him that you are convinced that he is capable of doing it properly. And as long as it does not, remember that it is your fear that lets him very little room to decide about his body. Don't force him ...


2

I have three children and each was a different experience in getting them to consistently brush their teeth. My oldest is 11 and unfortunately we were not very consistent with her as a youngster. She never wanted to brush her teeth. She brushes her teeth on her own now, but only because of what we did with the younger ones. My two youngest are 6 and 4. We ...


2

We have the same issue with our son and depending on the night he will stand as still as a statue as I brush his teeth while holding one of these in his mouth: http://www.amazon.com/Professional-Instruments-Dental-Mirror-Miltex/dp/B001AT96E6/ref=sr_1_1?s=hpc&ie=UTF8&qid=1302211911&sr=1-1 He likes that he is being "worked on". Sometimes he just ...


2

I was watching The Two Towers one day, while my daughter was watching a princess movie in the other room. She wandered in and started watching The Two Towers with me. There were some orcs on the screen, and it struck me. "Addison, see those guys? They're called orcs. See their teeth? They're yucky aren't they? That's what happens when you don't brush ...


2

The kid should already know that brushing his/her teeth before sleeptime is part of the drill. What we do is count down from a slowly increasing number (started with 10, 15 the next day currently we start at 100,90,80....25,24...3,2,1) After the countdown our child could brush his own teeth for as long as he wanted too. Brushing the front teeth when they ...


2

As soon as the teeth are through, you start to brush. Get him into the habit of spending time brushing teeth to establish good oral hygiene. Be careful that if you use toothpaste (pea sized amount), it's not swallowed.



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