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14

I'm the original poster. Nobody gave an answer that covers what turned out to be the actual cause, so I'm posting this answer to bring closure to this question. Hopefully this will be useful to anybody who is experiencing the same issue with their child. It turns out that the cause of the breath holding was due to swollen tonsils and adenoids. The enlarged ...


6

As Beofett already stated, lack of breathing brings about a sense of panic that is too powerful for most 5yo kids to counter. However, here are some things you can try to help lessen the duration of the panic reaction to something more manageable: Get a cheap wireless doorbell unit and put the button by his bed, and the receiver by your bed. This way he ...


4

I'm asthmatic and started when I was a toddler, but I learned early on that panicking only made things worse. I would disagree with those who say a 5-year-old is too young to learn to suppress the urge to panic, because I found I was able to starting around the time I was 4-5 years old. It takes education, practice, and most of all a calm parent who is ...


4

Not a doctor, but based on my child's countless colds which landed him overnight in the hospital once and on oral and inhaled steroids twice (all before he turned 18 months old), I would definitely go see a doctor if you are concerned. (Turns out our son has cold-induced asthma aggravated by mold we found in our home.) The congestion itself is ...


4

Plenty of babies have colds and survive just fine. :) A stuffy nose doesn't prevent mouth breathing -- so put a humidifier in the room (the cold-water type) to prevent that irritating his throat, watch for fever, and he'll be fine. "SIDS" is one of those medical terms like "idiopathic" that means, in layman's terms, "we don't know WTF just happened, let ...


4

For a immediate fix a steam session is quite helpful for opening up the lungs and make the child more comfortable. It's also important to learn what sets off an attack in your child, so you can avoid those stimuli. For example running in the cold gives me an attack every time, so I avoid it if at all possible. Others I know have allergies that trigger ...


3

I have a 5 year old asthmatic boy who does this and it is one of the first signs that he is starting to have issues with a flare-up of his asthma. I first noticed it while listening to him watching TV in another room. Our pediatrician says what is happening is he is overpressurizing his lungs to help him get more air into the constricted spaces. He doesn't ...


3

Unfortunately, I think the answer is "no". Once he is older you can probably work with him to improve the situation (if it hasn't already cleared up by then), but at 5 years old it just may be too early. Difficulty in breathing triggers an automatic fear response in the brain: The interesting mind-body part of asthma is that the anxiety parts of our ...


2

I think it's just bad practice in breathing. That happens to people sometimes, they get stuck in a pattern that's wrong. The most common is inflating your chest instead of your stomach when you breathe. Practicing consciously breathing correctly usually fixes it I don't know how to do that with a child, but the specialist you are about to see will.


2

I have a 10 year old son that has done this regularly all his life. He also has had asthma from 11 months old. I really think they are related and think the pediatrician who says he is unconsciously over pressurizing his lungs seem to make sense. I certainly notice it more when his asthma is about to or is glaring up he does it at night before sleeping and ...


1

At that age, kids learn more from copying you than from listening to you. It sounds like you are already acting calmly yourselves during an episode. Make sure to show him what to do more than telling. If it's happening so infrequently, it might be beneficial to roleplay it with him before bed every night until he can do it without prompting, then a ...


1

A three-year-old could be experiencing breathing difficulties but lack the verbiage to talk about them or the awareness to realize they are difficulties. Given that you haven't paid any attention to it in the past, and he's still doing it, it could either be a bad habit or indicative of some condition. Asthma is a concern, but how about: seasonal ...



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