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8

Getting a good latch is indeed very important, and if you suspect your baby is not latching properly now is a very good time to work on it, before it becomes a hard-to-break-habit for your child to latch in a suboptimal way. First, the size of the areola, "the brown part of the breast", varies between women. Some women have very small areolas, others have ...


7

You are probably fighting against his natural social development by expecting him to go back to the breast after having grown beyond it. Natural weaning can start as early as 6 months (when solids are introduced) and often occurs by age one (with increases in appetite and activity). Your son has developed his first level of independence with some control ...


7

If you're talking about what is officially termed "kangaroo care", for premature and special-needs babies, then you'd need to follow your doctors' recommendations for their care. Kangaroo care may be recommended for up to several hours at a time, but it would depend on how medically stable the baby was. On the other hand, if you are talking about a more ...


7

In rare cases, if mom hs certain types of inffectious diseases, this can be a problem because they can spread - but for most people not at all. In fact, it is completely normal for blood to be in the milk (especially with first-time moms) anyway (even with healthy nipples). You just don't always see it because it is in such small amounts. It can make ...


5

The single biggest factor affecting milk production is how much milk your baby drinks. Yes, at extremes, you need to enough body hydration to be able to produce milk, but your body reacts to your baby's feeding habits. If the baby doesn't take much, your milk production will slow; if your baby takes large quantities of milk then your body will increase milk ...


5

There are lots of links to studies showing the beneficial uses of breastmilk here: http://kellymom.com/bf/can-i-breastfeed/illness-surgery/healing-breastmilk/ In particular, it does not "become a breeding ground for bacteria" due to its natural antimicrobial properties.


4

While I would agree with others that you might want to give breastfeeding another chance (your local hospital probably has a lactation consultant on staff), there are many things to consider when making the choice of a breast pump. Learning to pump successfully can be just as tricky as learning to breastfeed. Pumping is time-consuming. Baby sucks at a rate ...


4

We tried both. While the nipple is the most intuitive user interface in the world, it can take some practice and trial and error between mom and baby to get in a good feeding groove. Adjusting the baby's head just a few centimeters can sometimes make a world of difference, so don't give up on it just yet. After a few weeks, my wife (mostly) breast fed, while ...


3

A 2011 article in the journal Clinical Lactation (Mohrbacher, Nancy. The Magic Number and Long-Term Milk Production, Vol 2-1, 15-18) explains the physiology behind breast milk production, which is dependent on breast fullness and breast storage capacity. Fullness Full breasts make milk slower. You want to nurse (or express) before your breasts are full. ...


3

The guideline is that you can add fresh milk to frozen milk as long as the amount of frozen is greater than the amount of fresh you add. Otherwise you raise the temperature of the frozen milk into a risky range. The usual strategy is to use breastmilk storage bags such as Lanisoh's, Medela's, Ameda's, or I am sure there are other options. Since breastmilk ...


3

The normal advice for formula is that you should not re-use a bottle that has been partially used, in line with the advice given above. The advice for breastmilk is different (breastmilk naturally has antimicrobial properties) so it is generally considered OK to re-use a bottle of breastmilk. It can be stored at room temperature for up to an hour and in the ...


3

It is almost certain they do not need this bacteria. Have a look at this question on Skeptics. the European Food Safety authority has researched 800 health claims of such companies, and they could not find relationships. There is some evidence that probiotics can help in certain situations, for a small subset of the population, but that is about it. ...


3

Anyone who has nursed a baby for two years can continue longer without worrying about "losing the milk" or the like. The reasons for stopping nursing after two years are usually: she is pregnant again and nursing is painful, or she believes she will get more sleep if she weans the toddler, or she wants the toddler to switch out of baby mode before the new ...


3

Breast milk can keep up to six months in the freezer, up to 3-4 days in the fridge, and up to 4-6 hours outside it (a lactation specialist once told me). So the best solution in your case is to put it in the fridge. Put it into a sterile container such as a sterilized bottle. You can also divide it into portions depending on how much your baby drinks ...


2

For establishing a healthy milk supply, the first two weeks are critical. During that time allow your baby to suck regularly. Infant sucking increases the number of prolactin receptors which is critical to future milk supply. Begin this as early as possible in the hospital, according to a guide from LLLI. During the first two weeks do not use a pump in ...


2

Manuals can be good, but they can hurt your hand after awhile and be time consuming. They are much cheaper, though. You can also get milk out by hand over a large bowl to collect the milk. I had trouble with supply and found that often worked better than the pump, but it's quite time consuming and will really tire out your hand after awhile. I wouldn't ...


2

We always froze it, then if you forget about it/don't need it/whatever, you're fine. Once frozen, it can keep for 6 months, some sources say more. To use it, sterilize a bottle, warm the frozen milk in a bath of warm water, then pour into the bottle. Do not microwave at any step. Maybe I'm maybe taking for granted here the storage mechanism: find a pump ...


2

What we were recommended, and found incredibly useful, was to use ice cube trays. Then once the milk has frozen in cubes you can put as many as you need into bags, clean and sterilise the trays and make another set. This meant we could easily take the amount we might need for that half-day, day, weekend or however long.


2

Soem sites say that you can keep it freezed for as long as 6 months, as long they are in the freezer (source: http://kellymom.com/bf/pumpingmoms/milkstorage/milkstorage/) How we deal with it: use the pumper for several days, so that the baby wouldn't be out of food while we were saving it for the future separate in plastic bags (don't know their name in ...


2

I'm not quite sure I understand what you mean but this is what it made me think of: While googling for that image, I came across this one which looks like the thing I think you're requesting: I didni't think such a thing really existed, but hey, you can buy anything on Amazon! $6.99 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. I'm surprised.


2

Try a warm compress on the knot for a few days, several times a day. She can also try to GENTLY massage the knot towards the nipple; if it's a blocked duct, the warm compress should loosen it up, and then she can massage it out of the nipple. If she presents with a fever or pain, or anything that seems like it could be an infection, make sure she heads to ...


1

After some search I got this podee bottle feeder which seems to be something similar to what I was searching for. Also the picture I saw on in the manuals was this , and is called SNS generally used by adoptive mothers: The podee bottle feeder seems to be an interesting invention going by the reviews on amazon. Unfortunately this is not available in our ...


1

To answer your question: I can't imagine for a moment that anyone sells anything like that. I'm no doctor, but from my personal experience, an automatic drip milk dispenser doesn't approximate any biological function. Bottles are old technology yes. But that doesn't mean it's outdated or can be made 'more efficient'. Millions of years of trial and error ...


1

WARNING! This response may contain discussion of breastmilk that some may find 'icky'. Yet most people are usually ok with drinking milk intended for baby cows... Getting milk Probably the most pressing thing is the supply issue - how do you obtain breastmilk for a premature baby. The odds are good that you aren't producing any useful milk yourself. ...



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