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23

It is the baby's first growth spurt. Major growth spurts occur at 2, 3, and 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months. They can last a little more than week (such as in your case). If a two week old baby is demanding the boob, it probably needs it. However, there are babies who have trouble nursing and will keep on wanting the boob in attempt to get milk out. It IS ...


20

TL;DR - exclusive breastfeeding: 6 months, partial breast-feeding: 12 months or longer Well, since you asked about research papers, here they are. The optimal duration of exclusive breastfeeding: a systematic review. (abstract) (2004) Based on the results of this review, the World Health Assembly adopted a resolution to recommend exclusive ...


20

As long as he is getting enough in each 24-hour cycle, and he remains on-course on his weight chart, and if he can sleep 4-5 hours between feedings, then go with that and don't wake him up. I would only wake him if there's reason to be concerned.


19

In most cases, drinking less than 300mg of caffeine a day will not affect your baby. Even if your child is extra sensitive to caffeine, the effects aren't serious, and they will go away if you eliminate caffeine from your diet. Newborns tend to be more sensitive to caffeine than older babies. They can't break it down very quickly, so it can build up in ...


18

Due to individual differences, healthy full-term babies may breastfeed as often as every hour or as infrequently as every four hours and thrive. As long as the baby is getting enough, you can follow his lead for when to feed him. However, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that newborns nurse at least 8-12 times every 24 hours. If the baby ...


15

This is very normal. As a mother who breast feeds my child does this as well, it is called cluster feeding. Although it can be very frustrating there really isn't much you can do about it. Usually once babies come out of the "newborn" stage, the cluster feedings stop. Although once in a while they can pop up when the infant is going through a growth spurt. ...


15

There is generally no reason at all to stop breastfeeding just because you are pregnant [1] [2] [3] [4]. As with all pregnancies, it is important that the mother keeps a healthy, well balanced diet. Her body will be perfectly able to produce milk as well as provide for the growing fetus inside her. The milk may change in taste due to the hormonal changes in ...


13

This is something babies do. What looks like her entire meal is more likely a lot of drool and mucus, some stomach acid, and just enough breast milk to tint it white. There are some situations where a large amount of milk/formula gets burped up, and this is usually one of two situations; an overfull stomach (some babies will eat to bursting; the reflexes ...


13

Breast milk will separate. Just lightly swirl it back together. As long as you are following safe Breast milk storage guidelines the milk should be fine. And please stop throwing it away, your wife worked hard to make that!


11

Anecdotal evidence from my baby (Now 9 weeks): Your Diaper & Stool issues are perfectly normal. The Wiggling of legs is supposed to help, a little side to side motion should help also. Look up "Baby Massage" to help her relax. The Babies internal plumbing is still getting started. Dont expect things to run perfectly straight away! If in doubt ...


10

I believe you got a wrong advice regarding breastfeeding (As far as I know pediatricians get little to no training in breastfeeding so their advice regarding breastfeeding should be taken with a grain of salt). The most nourishing milk is hind milk which takes a while to get to. You certainly should not limit the baby's time on the breast and you should ...


10

The pros for a very young child is it promotes trust and bonding when their needs are met immediately, or close to it. They also cry less and tend to be more peaceful in their awake times. The con is more when they get older. It is harder to predict and manage a child's feeding schedule if there is no schedule. I have seen with breastfeeding children ...


10

It is absolutely real. When our son was born, he had jaundice, so the doctors had us feed him some formula through a syringe for the first 2 days to lower the bilirubin levels. Our son started sucking on the syringe, despite our best efforts to avoid this. As a result, he became extremely frustrated while attempting to breastfeed, as the milk was not ...


10

It turns out that most of these laws vary state to state. I did some research and this site has the US federal, and state by state laws relating to breastfeeding. In my own state, Oregon, Or. Rev. Stat. § 653.075, § 653.077 and § 653.256 (2007) allow women to have unpaid 30-minute breaks during each four-hour shift to breastfeed or pump. Allows certain ...


10

Some nipples require less effort than nursing from the breast. Milk flows from some just by holding them upside down. In this case, the child only has to stop the flow by covering the opening with the tongue to rest or to swallow. Some children prefer this pattern to the sucking necessary for the breast. Of course, the strength for later eating and speech ...


10

As suggested above plus a bit more what we've been doing with our six week old when she's prematurely falling asleep mid-feed is: Feed until she falls asleep Remove items of clothing until she wakes again Feed until she falls asleep We've found rubbing the palms of her hands as she feeds, if she looks like she's dropping off, helps. our midwife mentioned ...


10

If he won't eat he's probably not hungry. Around one their growth slows down and they eat a bit less, and if he's still getting breast fed then he's probably getting enough calories from that he doesn't need solid food. So if you want him to eat: Stop breast feeding and bottle feeding so he will be hungry for solids Introduce a variety of foods, and make ...


10

So this doesn't seem too unusual to me. Many babies prefer to be held, and some more than others. A few suggestions: Have you tried swaddling? The feeling of being wrapped mimics the feeling in the womb, and my babies would not sleep without being swaddled. have you tried a swing? Some babies really like the gentle rocking motion (again, this mimics the ...


9

She's probably into the first growth spurt already and as such is hungry all the time. It is, unfortunately harder on Mom if she's got a toddler around that also needs attention. Try to keep up the feedings on demand as they are now; chances are they WILL taper off somewhat if it is a growth spurt. Otherwise, she might be nursing for comfort as well; ...


9

Hate to be that person, but.. Get up every few hours. If it's an option, make sure your partner is getting up with the child, doing the changing, burping, etc so you can focus on feeding and sleeping. The fact that your child is snacking all night isn't worrying in itself - they'll do that, if the food is available. But if you worry about him spitting up ...


9

Breastmilk is about 80-90% water as it is, so there really is no need to add additional water to it. Water use is also discouraged for the reason you used it: newborns can fill up on water, so they should not be given water. (It's like filling up on cookies instead of an actual meal. Their growing bodies need good nutrition.) Your wife is correct that water ...


9

I can't answer all of your questions, but I can give it a good shot: Certain substances you eat have been shown to affect breastmilk production. Most of these substances are herbs. For example, apparently people have been using fenugreek to increase milk supply for hundreds if not thousands of years. This website has an interesting list of herbs that ...


8

That's what's great about parenting. As soon as you start getting it down, it changes. It's a stage every child goes through. As they gain more control over their bodies, they assert it. Try some different holds until you find one that works. I've found two different ones useful. One is to cradle the baby in my left arm, but hold the baby's right arm ...


8

Are you adequately nourished? Do you take supplements at all to compensate for your dietary choices that result in reduced levels of required nutrients? Do your ethics also extend to taking in supplements that are animal-sourced? There are vegans or vegetarian who eat very well, widely and balanced, there are carnivores who eat badly, so I don't think it's ...


8

In my experience babies typically want to eat more often than this. But as long as your pediatrictian thinks your baby's weight gain is healthy, I wouldn't worry about it too much. It's really best not to feed on a schedule when they're this young and just focus on giving them as much as they want. I would consider trying to observe your baby more closely ...


8

It is interesting that your medical practitioners are advising you otherwise. Mine said that it was no problem. I breastfed all the way through the 7th month of my pregnancy - until my daughter weaned herself off. Mayo Clinic is a trusted source (non-profit medical practice & research group). The recommendation from there basically amounts to listen to ...


8

I know this hardly seems like an answer at all, but better fitting glasses are probably your best option. Mom likely doesn't even need new glasses, but maybe just an adjustment for a better fit around the ears. Good luck!


8

It may be obvious except to new parents, but make sure to burp the baby after every feeding. Some babies also need to be burped once or twice during feeding. The point is to get the air out of the stomach before it goes into the intestines. Baby massage is also often helpful: gently rub the belly in a circular motion; clockwise when facing the baby. This ...


8

I appreciate you asked for advice on foods, but you may have more luck with environmental factors, which have more evidence behind them. The advice from our midwife and the breastfeeding helpline was to make sure you're doing at least one night feed (2am-6am). Apparently early morning feeds have more influence over milk production than the daily feeds. The ...


8

My daughter had overwhelming trouble nursing - very similar to what you are describing. I cannot give you a hard and fast answer, but I have a few thoughts from my experiences. First, breastfeeding is the hardest thing I have ever done. It was emotionally difficult, as well as physically difficult with my daughter. It is also my most proud accomplishment ...



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