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3

Try giving him a sippy cup or a cup with a straw during meal times. If you really want to continue with bottles, then have someone else give him the bottle - and make sure you are no where to be seen when it's given to him. If you are using formula during the bottle feeding, then try switching out the formula.


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If you're using BPA and Pthalate free bottles and nipples, then what we can say is that there's no known significant concern from doing so. It's impossible to say that there are no side effects, though,and there could well be other endocrine disruptors not yet known in the plastics (BPA after all was not known about immediately, either). You will have to ...


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Until babies do notice, the solution is just to gently remove the bottle, and either replace with another bottle if she still needs more, or let her suck on a (clean) knuckle or fingertip. You shouldn't let her just suck on air, as she will need to burp a lot, and until she does it could be uncomfortable for her. Have you looked at how much you are feeding ...


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Breastfeeding is always way better for the baby, health wise, so if possible I would start by switching back to breastfeeding, but of course there are sometimes reasons why this is not doable. The other thing to try is switching to a lactose free formula. Lots of babies are lactose intolerant. They grow out of this quickly as their bodies start producing ...


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At age 2, she almost certainly doesn't need the calories to get through the night. Most babies reach that point at about 6 months. She needs to learn how to soothe herself to sleep, and you need to give her the opportunity to learn.


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If you should or should not let her cry it out is completely up to you (obviously). There is a lot of research on crying out loud, most of what I hear lately tells that crying out loud is harmfull ( https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/moral-landscapes/201112/dangers-crying-it-out ) Ofcourse a lot of people tell something different, but my opinion (personal ...


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You can use stainless steel bottles too, such as these: http://www.toysrus.com/product/index.jsp?productId=21426456&camp=PLAPPCG-_-PID15966605:BRUS&cagpspn=plab_15966605&eESource=CAPLA_DF:21426456:TRUS


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As far as I know, our elders are used this mainly because it is bacteria free, boosts immunity, non toxic and cools the body - mainly, it will retain and restores freshness of water and liquids. Boosts immunity? How? Cools the body? Huh? What is the mechanism by which silver "refreshes" a liquid? What does that even mean? People were using it ...


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My wife and I are fighting this fight right now, because our exclusively-breastfed-until-now 2-month-old daughter is struggling to gain weight. The standard advice is to try different nipples, different formulas, and have Mom be out of the room or even out of the house. Clearly that works for some people, but it has not worked for us. What is slowly ...


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Waking a 8 moths old baby for feeding is definitely not necessary. At this age a healthy baby is physically capable of sleeping through the night without eating. She'll fill her belly in the morning, don't worry. Being hungry most likely is not the reason for waking at night. Nightwakings are common even for older children, but they're mostly connected to ...


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There are actually a few other options than just switching brands - you can use a spoon, a beaker or a sippy cup to feed your baby. At five months you either have already done or probably will soon start with solid foods and these tools are going to be part of your equipment anyway. Some exclusively breastfed babies simoly dislike baby bottles, but readily ...


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Babies have a need to suck. It brings comfort. Breastfeeding has the advantage that it delivers milk & satisfies the need to suck at the same time. Drinking from the bottle, while requiring effort, does not satisfy this need enough. My daughter is a very fast drinker, so when she finished a bottle, she got a pinky or a pacifier. I do admit that for my ...


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Do you wiggle the bottle to get the last drops into the nipple? This alone can signal the end of the bottle, especially if you start wiggling occassionally before it needs to be. I would also hesitate to let your daughter suck air. In all likelihood, she'll burp it up, but in a less desirable scenario, some of it will make it to the small intestines where ...



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