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10

The current scientific consensus is: No. It is not necessary to sterilize bottles, not even for newborns. The only exception are bottle teats made of rubber - the rubber can become porous over time, so occasional sterilization is recommended. However, most bottle teats are made of silicone, which is not affected. The primary safety measure to take with ...


8

Breast milk is, essentially, water with a bunch of other nutritious stuff in it. Water intoxication can be a concern if an infant drinks too much plain water in addition to breast milk or formula, but that requires a significant volume of water: Breast milk or formula provides all the fluid healthy babies need. If a mother feels her baby needs to ...


4

For completeness, our baby was scheduled for a Continuous feed NGT tube, the tube from her nose to her stomach. Then was to be a slow drip feed, the equivalent of her normal feeding oz/per bottle feed now oz/hour. The advantage to this, for her, was no big bump of food at any given time, so no chance of a big dose of reflux. The bad news, you have a tube ...


3

You should be able to score a few notches in a non-critical part of the nipple (not entirely through - just lightly score the top) with a razor blade or similar. Three in a row about 5mm apart or less should be fairly easy to identify by feel, especially if you do it twice on 180° opposite sides. Do that for one size and not the other, and presto, easily ...


3

Try giving him a sippy cup or a cup with a straw during meal times. If you really want to continue with bottles, then have someone else give him the bottle - and make sure you are no where to be seen when it's given to him. If you are using formula during the bottle feeding, then try switching out the formula.


3

The water content of breast milk varies a lot (even during feedings) - much more than a few drops of remaining water would "dillute". Please take a look at this picture from wikipedia: thinner (=more watery) foremilk vs. thicker (=fattier) hindmilk. The only reason to be worried would be if you were washing the bottles with unsafe water, for example if ...


3

Signs of dehydration include: 1) sunken fontanelle 2) dark urine / less than six wet nappies in 24 hours 3) dry sometimes sticky lips If you're worried about dehydration you might want to speak to a doctor or health visitor. Your baby is probably getting enough fluid from breastmilk. For the first year the baby will have either breast milk or infant ...


2

For the record, both our midwife and paediatric told us to put the baby on the breast, facing us after each meal. We should gently pat her on the back a couple of times. We should not wait for her to burp but pat her a only couple of times. Our daughter usually burped very quickly, but the advice was specifically not to try too hard to get a burp; if she ...


2

My daughter had a similar behavior, which was due (in her case) by colic (not sure if this is the right way to say it, english is not my native language). I am not saying that this is the case for your child, but it could be worth prospecting. What was happening to my daughter (at least how I understood it) was that feeding her calmed the pains, which would ...


2

I had this problem as my little one had poor suction anyway, especially when he was teething. Chewing is soothing to sore gums. Rather than putting the bottle in baby's mouth, I put it to his lips so he had to suck it in. I would also stroke his chin at the same time. However, this only works if baby is hungry. As he was feeding, if he began to chew, I ...


2

Sterilization using solely water or steam would indeed take more than five minutes. Steam that is just at 100°C would take close to an hour and a half to completely sterilize the vessels - and a better process is to repeat it several times (Tyndallization, referenced in that article as well). However, you're not just using steam here; you're also washing ...


2

Until babies do notice, the solution is just to gently remove the bottle, and either replace with another bottle if she still needs more, or let her suck on a (clean) knuckle or fingertip. You shouldn't let her just suck on air, as she will need to burp a lot, and until she does it could be uncomfortable for her. Have you looked at how much you are feeding ...


2

Breastfeeding is always way better for the baby, health wise, so if possible I would start by switching back to breastfeeding, but of course there are sometimes reasons why this is not doable. The other thing to try is switching to a lactose free formula. Lots of babies are lactose intolerant. They grow out of this quickly as their bodies start producing ...


1

There are actually a few other options than just switching brands - you can use a spoon, a beaker or a sippy cup to feed your baby. At five months you either have already done or probably will soon start with solid foods and these tools are going to be part of your equipment anyway. Some exclusively breastfed babies simoly dislike baby bottles, but readily ...


1

Babies have a need to suck. It brings comfort. Breastfeeding has the advantage that it delivers milk & satisfies the need to suck at the same time. Drinking from the bottle, while requiring effort, does not satisfy this need enough. My daughter is a very fast drinker, so when she finished a bottle, she got a pinky or a pacifier. I do admit that for my ...


1

Do you wiggle the bottle to get the last drops into the nipple? This alone can signal the end of the bottle, especially if you start wiggling occassionally before it needs to be. I would also hesitate to let your daughter suck air. In all likelihood, she'll burp it up, but in a less desirable scenario, some of it will make it to the small intestines where ...


1

My son is 6 months and didn't stop his night feedings until 5 months. He is 16 lbs now was 6 lbs when he was born. I bathe him and put him to bed no later than 8:30. If he does wake up I put his binky in his mouth and he falls right back to sleep. That's how I broke his night feedings.


1

This is my first time commenting on a place like this. I'm a new mother at 21 with an 8 week old son. I am also a stay at home mother. He still sleeps about 4 times a day and when i put him down at midnight with a 5 to 6 oz bottle, he's out till 6:30-7. He just started this, but he will get hiccups and I know to stop between every 2 oz to burp. He dosent ...


1

My wife and I are fighting this fight right now, because our exclusively-breastfed-until-now 2-month-old daughter is struggling to gain weight. The standard advice is to try different nipples, different formulas, and have Mom be out of the room or even out of the house. Clearly that works for some people, but it has not worked for us. What is slowly ...


1

As it is a very trendy matter nowadays, I would also explore lactose intolerance as a possible cause of this. it may be that your child quickly gets under the impression she's done while it's just intolerance causing this. Therefore she quickly gets hungry, and so on... You can probably easily check this by testing soya milk for 1 or 2 feedings and see if ...


1

Have you tried decreasing the association between the breast and drinking liquid by giving her skin-to-skin cuddling time that doesn't involve beast-feeding? You or your wife could hold her in the crook of your (shirtless) arm while you turn the pages of a baby book or walk "tickle fingers" across her tummy, perhaps. Also see if she'll accept a cup or ...



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