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14

Move her into her own room. At 8 months of age, our daughter was in our room and still breastfeeding. She would wake up 2-3 times a night, from what we could tell was hunger. (She'd eat and then go back to sleep.) We are fairly quiet sleepers and don't really move around our bed so much, so it wasn't like we were making noises which would wake her up. I ...


13

The biggest risk is that the baby won't drink it. If your baby is content to drink cold milk, then it is perfectly fine. I couldn't find any online resources from medical professionals discussing it, but I did find that you are not alone in your situation :) Lots of other mothers have had this same dilemma, and many in that discussion shared that they ...


13

I would say it's completely safe so long as the bottles have been adequately rinsed to remove any detergent residue. There will always be trace bacteria kicking around in many places, even if the bottle was clear, by the time you have assembled the cup and lid and teat etc together, and handled the formula container which last week was sat on a supermarket ...


10

It is absolutely real. When our son was born, he had jaundice, so the doctors had us feed him some formula through a syringe for the first 2 days to lower the bilirubin levels. Our son started sucking on the syringe, despite our best efforts to avoid this. As a result, he became extremely frustrated while attempting to breastfeed, as the milk was not ...


10

Some nipples require less effort than nursing from the breast. Milk flows from some just by holding them upside down. In this case, the child only has to stop the flow by covering the opening with the tongue to rest or to swallow. Some children prefer this pattern to the sucking necessary for the breast. Of course, the strength for later eating and speech ...


8

No, it's not required. Lots of children are born into dirty surroundings and still survive. Yes, it's advised for newborns and infants because they have not yet built up enough immune resistance. Baby bottles, teething toys, and other objects that the newborn/infant puts in the mouth can be sterilized to reduce any unnecessary burden on the child. Once the ...


8

Children need to learn to eat and it is slow and difficult work. At 6 months or so the food they get by spoon or hand may or may not serve any nutritional purpose, but is part of that learning process for them (and for the adults trying to get it into them.) As time goes past between that first mouthful and say the one-year mark so much happens: the baby ...


8

I'd say as long as she's not having an excess amount of gas pains then she's fine. There will always be some bouts of gas pain to deal with (at those times we found that moving my wee girl's legs around in a slow bicycle motion and tummy rubs tended to help). As babies age their digestive systems change. Her little stomach will grow and strengthen, ...


6

Both my sons needed to be fed by bottle early on (my wife didn't produce enough to breast-feed). What we experienced was that if we didn't take a pause to burp in the middle of the meal, he would more likely gulp up when finished. So for us it was basically twice for each meal (one in the middle of the meal, and one after finished). It was not always easy to ...


6

We had a similar situation with my 14 month old, and it was definately a sleep association rather than actual hunger (although it was with the breast, rather than a bottle). After figuring out it was a sleep assocaition, we just cut off 1 feed per few weeks or so (ie. first wake of the night we did not offer milk), and offered comfort instead (cuddles from ...


6

We used to undo the legs on the babygrow to keep their feet out - this meant we could tickle their feet if they started to fall asleep before they had had enough milk. Just a gentle tickle was usually enough to wake them up enough to feed (albeit sleepily)


6

For ours I find it works pretty well to start to simply start to pull the bottle out of her mouth, or wiggle it around. I start gentle and increase to fairly aggressive wiggling as needed and so far we have not suffered any bottle nipple related injuries. The advantage to this is you don't really have to change positions from feeding. However you have to ...


6

I did find research on the effect of milk temperature on preterm infants at http://milkbank.com/pdf/Stanford_Study_milk_feeding_temperature.pdf A summary of the results included the following statement: The infants in this study had a similar tolerance (as measured by gastric residuals) to both cool temperature milk (10°C) and room temperature milk (24°C). ...


6

5 months old is far from "extended" use of the bottle! Now that I've seen this question, your other question also makes a lot more sense. There is evidence that indicates babies fed with breast milk are less likely to develop early childhood caries (cavities), as well as a number of other diseases. Many breast-fed babies also use bottles while mom is ...


5

As a speech language pathologist, I encourage straw cups over sippy cups! Spouted cups require generally the same oral motor skills as drinking from a nipple. The tongue is positioned forward under the spout.These sucking patterns are more immature and may actually impede the development of a more mature swallow and speech patterns for some children. Also, ...


5

Many Hospitals in the US have Lactation consultants and this is all they do. We had issues with our second child that was stressing both the baby and the mommy out. The consultant came in and worked wonders for us. Also check out La Leche League, an organization of lactation consultants: http://www.llli.org/resources.html


5

A six month old can sleep up to eight hours without feeding. We had the issue that I had to work (+ commute) while breastfeeding and was getting utterly exhausted by having to wake up for night-time feeds. A pediatrician told us that our then six-month-old son is asking for his night-time bottles because of the comfort and company and not out of hunger. We ...


5

I think you can talk to your child at any time, keeping in mind that it may be distraction, especially when it is time to go to sleep. During breast-feeding, the child will be focussed on feeding, and will generally be in a quite relaxed state. Talking gently during this time is likely to be good for the bond with the child, but it could also be ...


5

The American Academy of Pediatricians recommends stopping bottle useage at age 1. Many pediatricians recommend making the switch away from the bottle by 15 months. Others set the limit at 18 months. A few say the switch is not necessary until 2. The concerns with extended bottle feeding are: Children who were still bottle feeding at age 2 were more likely ...


5

It is difficult to assess bottle risk as separate from formula risk, because formula is delivered by bottle, where breast milk generally is not. Therefore the results of studies on either may or may not be generalized to both. Some points to consider regarding bottles in particular: Some germs are not killed by boiling. Sterilization may not be enough ...


4

Babies take a while to build up resistance to infection, so sterilising bottles, at least for the first few months, is definitely recommended. Milk is a very good food not only for babies, but for bacteria so you want to get bottles clean, and then sterilised!


4

My husband and I visit his family in Wisconsin at least once or twice or year. Until this year, we lived in Tennessee and this was a 12+ hour drive which we dutifully did with our son/son and daughter until this year when we realized that driving from Georgia would add another 4 hours to the drive. So now we fly. During that time, we ALWAYS stopped to ...


4

While it might be useful on a long road trip to be able to do this, it is certainly easier to do this when at a rest stop - one of mine really needed to be burped after a bottle, and this worked best in the traditional 'over the shoulder' position, so we couldn't have done that safely when driving. It also gives both the driver and partner time to work ...


4

If a gentle turn of the bottle doesn't get our now eight month old to restart sucking, we move on to rubbing his belly. If that doesn't work, I generally change his diaper. Simply undressing him and tickling him doesn't seem to work at all for us, but I know that has worked for a number of friends.


4

You should never microwave the milk. The only way to warm up the milk is under warm running water which takes some time but it is acceptable. There are special bags available for freezing milk which contain enough for one feeding. If the baby is less than 6 weeks old you wife should not express milk unless absolutely necessary in order not to cause ...


4

Some suggestions you could explore: Try another brand until you find one that works. A lot of people I know who breastfed and did bottle feeding had success with the Playtex bottles that have a disposable bag you put the milk in. I think the suction to the bag simulated the breast better perhaps? There are corresponding ages for the flow speed so perhaps ...


4

I had the same problem and corrected it. Let me give you the insights I learned during this process and some things I tried to get the biting to stop, which it eventually did: The gums rise significantly before the teeth come out and affect the way a baby latches (to a bottle or breast). At 6 months the baby starts eating more solids, which means they need ...


4

I think baby bottle addiction was much more of a concern before the advent of sippy cups. There are many good reasons to break your child of a bottle including Dental hygiene Drinking from a bottle all day and/or all night can cause tooth decay even in teeth that haven't emerged yet. Both breastmilk and formula have lactose in them which provides food ...


4

My son was born at 24 weeks and he would only burp after every second or third bottle. The NICU doctors and feeding specialists all said it is normal and that some babies just do not burp like people expect since burps are just air in the stomach. If you are really worried that she is swallowing too much air and for some reason is not able to burp then I ...


3

If the majority of feedings are nursing, you should be able to tell if you're starting to have any issues with nursing and adjust the bottles. You can decrease the bottle feedings if you have nursing issues, and change the bottle. As for the actual difference, there's the milk vs formula taste, flow of liquid, temperature, and shape of the nipple. Taste: ...



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