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56

This book works differently for people at different stages of their lives. The lesson for young children reading this book, I believe, is about unconditional love. Children need to know and trust that their parents will always be there for them, loving them without question, even if they need them their whole lives. You could say to your young child, "I'm ...


15

The lesson in The Giving Tree is not from the tree's point of view. It is from the boy's. The reader will more immediately identify with the boy, after all (if a child, in particular) - and so the lesson is to be aware of people giving to you, and be grateful for it, rather than continually demanding. The boy doesn't feel happy, after all, until the end - ...


13

My mom counted. My brothers and I took it as permission to continue the undesired behavior until the next to last number. The same thing is true with repeated warnings for bad behavior. The child gets conditioned that Mom doesn't mean it the first few times she says it. I think it "1 2 3 Magic" is an improvement for some parents because it forces them to ...


10

The only thing that really matters is that you read with her regularly as part of a bedtime or playtime routine. If you find a way to make the laptop work for you so that you both can read it together comfortably before bed, that is excellent. Books themselves are so much less important than enjoying reading that it doesn't even compare. There is no harm at ...


8

Regarding the second point, the idea is that it teaches the child to do things in an appropriate setting. Instead of spitting inside, we go outside into the garden and have a game there. It's about positive reinforcement of what you wanted to say anyway. If our kids start chucking stuff around, we tell them that they can go outside and do that which is fine ...


7

Here are a few places that I have found that are kind of home school related but I figure I will use as color pages to help my kids learn as they are playing. http://www.mrprintables.com/printable-alphabet-book.html http://www.schoolsparks.com/kindergarten-worksheets Here are some pinterest searchs that may have what you need: ...


7

Often if you go to the websites of her favourite characters websites (Peppa pig, for example) you'll find things to print for colouring in ("things to do" or "activities" normally). Another approach you may want to consider is something that can be reset, for example: 1) White-board 2) Blackboard 3) A reusable colouring book like ReColoritz


7

This sounds like pretty normal 15 month old "GOOD LORD I CAN MOVE MYSELF THIS IS AWESOME", but if it's truly looking out of control, you might want to consider talking to your paediatrician, just as a check. I think we do have a few questions on hyperactivity on the site. As far as the reading goes, children generally want to mimic their parents. My ...


7

A 15 month old not only cannot read, but doesn't yet know that those black marks on the paper are words, or that what you are saying is somehow controlled by what is on the paper. This is something they need to learn, and they learn it in modern society through picture-only, no-text books. These are typically heavy cardboard so the toddler doesn't wreck them ...


6

Have you just wandering around your local library? I've found quite a few books in ours with some pictures mixed with more complex text. Greek mythology works well - the stories are reasonably complex. We also used our library to get our daughter out of her comfort zone (in terms of themes). If she was stuck on Hardy Boys for too long, we'd try ...


6

The Giving Tree, like any creative fiction, is open to interpretation. That's the beauty of it. People have interpreted it as you did, and even as satire--not a children's book at all. Some think the tree is God. You see what I mean? It sounds like your son enjoys it, but you're looking for someone to refute your own adult interpretation of it. The problem ...


6

Fifteen months is early even for 100% picture books. It's far too early for understanding a storyline - it's too early for the level of imagination capable of understanding that there could be such a thing as a story. Most fifteen month olds aren't interested in books except as a very short and quick interaction with daddy/mommy. They probably aren't ...


5

Great question. This is not my area of expertise, but I contacted someone through my network that specializes in gifted and talented children and this is what she said: Some of my best friends are books by Halsted is a good book for the parents to have on their shelf. The parents can also go to shop.scholastic.com and look at books by reading level. I ...


5

One quick idea that comes to mind is all the line-art or black-and-white clip art in your computer's office suite. If you have MS Office then there is a huge library of clip art, and even more available online. You could select a bunch of suitable images and print them out. If you do this, do a quick calculation on printing costs first, because it might ...


5

Emergent Readers This is actually fairly easy for emergent readers because there are plenty of "leveled" books for them such as Frog and Toad, and Owl at Home. Early readers are labeled by the publishing company as being part of a series of steps clearly explained somewhere on the book. The "I Can Read" system, for example, has books labeled as "My First" ...


5

I think this book describes the relationship between mother nature and humans, and quite accurately too. We use the earth in exactly that way. We mine oil, harvest lumber, drive cars, just use, use, use, often without giving the source a second thought. And the earth simply allows us to take. I do not think it models human-human relationships at all, and ...


4

General "parenting" books aren't generally very good at all. In order to cover such a broad subject area, yet not be thousands of pages long multivolume works, they have to barely mention each subject and move on. In order to sell well they have to not bother anybody, and apply to as wide an audience as possible. These three constraints lead to books with ...


4

I am not familiar with the book, however, in therapy, I use a 1-2-3 count with a bit of a twist. I state the desired behavior. If no appropriate response, I begin counting - 1. I restate the desired behavior. If no indication of change, I ask, Do you need help? Then add - 2. When I say 3, I provide immediate even sudden hand over assist to get the job done. ...


4

We have a 19 month old son so we're in prime picture book buying mode at the moment! We find that for our son to fall in love with a book, it has to meet at least one (and preferably both) of these two criteria: A lot of action to look at; and Pictures of things that he's recently learned (whether it's a new word or a new activity). I'll give two ...


4

I asked a friend of mine who is a literacy education professor this same question. (My son just started kindergarten and tested in the middle of second grade for reading, and is moving up rapidly.) She offered this professional advice: Congratulations! What it amounts to is that your son already has strong skills for decoding text and has many strategies ...


4

Remember that the books were meant to go along at a one year pace. Harry was 11 in the first book as a first year student. Each of the following books represents another year at school and another year older. I would try to follow that pace with your child if possible to help with the growing pains and learning curves. By the third book Harry is a teenager ...


4

According to my experience, you will not "put her off" if you remember a few pointers: Any material, whether educational or otherwise, should be treated as an offer, not an obligation. Offer to read with her, but do not push her. Usually it's the "encouragement" that puts the child off, not the difficulty. The level should roughly match the developmental ...


3

Resources Personal Pages KrazyDad (mazes and puzzles) GuruParents (various tips + some numbering/counting material) AllKidsNetwork (writing, numbering/counting, drawing...) KidZone (lots of exercise worksheets) EngagingToddlerActivities (arts and crafts) LearnWithPlayAtHome (activities, arts and crafts, ...) Turbulus (in French, with pretty great stuff to ...


3

I just came across this description on how to create coloring book pages from your own photos: Turn your family photos into fun kids' coloring books for free! This simple tutorial will teach you how to turn any photograph into black and white outlines that you can print out at home. [...] I'm going to talk through this process in a lot of detail, but ...


3

You can search Google Images or bing images for a character of her choice with keywords like coloring pages and let her select from the thumbnails which image to print. In Google Images selecting for black and white images can save you the need for additional keywords. The sites that come up in the search often have a collection of coloring pages.


3

I saw a link to the following website and remembered your question. This site has paperdolls from 27 different countries you can print, color, and play with. http://www.education.com/slideshow/exploring-cultures-paper-dolls-world/paper-dolls-world-asia-I/


3

I read books that are possible borderlines WITH Alice. We read a lot together anyway, and since I would be there while reading with her, if she gets stuck, I'm there to help OR if the book starts to wander into territory that isn't appropriate I'm there to make a judgement call or at least answer questions if that is needed as well. If my daughter finds ...


3

If you want to continue breastfeeding your child once you go back to work, you need the whole bottle supply chain: A pump Plastic bags to freeze pumped breast milk Many women recommend a photo of your child that you look at while pumping. This releases some hormones that support the 'milking' process Equipment to keep milk pumped at work cool until you ...


3

The method works. Only took about a week to work on our children. Our son responded within a few days. Did it on all 3 of our children. After a while we skipped 1 and went straight to 2. When they were older all we had to do was raise up 2 fingers and that's all it took. Very rarely got to 3. Used it until they were 16 or so with no problems. Was great ...



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