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9

First, not every section that happens after labour begins is an emergency C section. In an emergency section, the cut is vertical and large, and everyone is in kind of a panic. You might get a general if you don't have an epidural already in place. These things have a bigger impact on you. In a "normal" section, the cut is low, horizontal, and relatively ...


8

If you feel you aren't being heard by your birth team, and there's time, I would strongly recommend seeking out a second opinion or an advocate to help you BE heard. Do you have the option of finding a doula? Having a doula helped me tremendously in my first pregnancy, as I was bucking the medical establishment in my birth plan. If you do not feel you ...


6

I would like to add (to expand upon @Adam Davis' comment) the concept of infant mortality. Because of our civilisation and technology we know that by even some basic intervention the risk of mother or child dying in child birth can be reduced. In the last century or so we have reduced mother's death in childbirth from 1% (my great-grandmother died in ...


5

We did this twice. Friends and family are obvious choices but we lived far away from family at the time. When #2 was born, #1 was not quite a year old and we had him stay the night at a friends house who also had a baby of the same age. #2 was was nice enough to show up at 6pm so we could have brought #1 back for the night. However, a quick phone call ...


3

Giving birth naturally puts a huge strain on your body and is exhausting, and having an operation also puts a huge strain on your body and is exhausting. Having both one after the other is a significant strain and takes a lot longer to recover from. This is why many women who have a high potential for a c-section will opt for an elective rather than try to ...


3

My question is: how do I respectfully handle this with the midwife and the hospital? How do I tactfully make them fully aware that I'm not paranoid, this is a genuine risk? Your midwife has done many deliveries, and if you're satisfied with her care so far, since there is no way to predict your need for a C-Section (even pelvimetry Xrays most likely ...


2

We birthed two children at home. When we had only our #1 child (22 months old), we were lucky, because the birth of #2 started at midnight, and #1 slept all night. We took #1 over to another room to sleep when the birth happened. The next morning #1 had a brother (#2) and was very happy. The birth of our #4 started in the early evening when the others (#1, ...


2

We birthed 6 of our 7 children at home (#2 was the only one born in a hospital). Our older kids were always at home during the births. Sometimes grandparents were able to watch them in another room, but not always. Sometimes we put them to bed and the baby was kind enough to be born at night. For our fourth baby, we didn't have either option so the assistant ...


2

There's not a lot of ways to know if you'll need a c-section or not before delivery. If your baby is breech, or if the placenta is too low, or other conditions then a c-section is basically required for a safe delivery, but apart from obvious indications, there's not a way to know for sure. I have two cousins who had c-sections, they had no idea they were ...



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