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14

One of the core reasons for this is actually a side-effect of the 'most intelligent beings on the planet' - we have very big brains. Evolution has taken us pretty much to the limit on size at birth - we are already almost the least developed physically at birth. Many mammals can walk an hour after birth, but we have developed large brains, and large heads. ...


10

Humans are fully capable of having unassisted births, and many chose to have them. Tradition, herd mentality, increased medical knowledge, and (unfortunatly) economical gain have shaped the way child birth is carried out in the world today (with great variety), but the way we birth says nothing about our physical capabilites to do so on our own. It is ...


9

When my daughter asked about my c-section scar, I told her that's the mark where the doctor removed her brother. Then again, he spent a few weeks in NICU and she was nearly 3, so she was a bit more aware of what was going on. She often asks for her baby story, and part of me telling her about her birth is when I tell her that Daddy cried when she was ...


9

First of all, congratulations to the mother! To answer your questions: As birth operations go up the rate of babies and mothers dying in childbirth goes down. Also, the rate of infant brain damage and birth-related injuries goes down. Be glad of this, without the operation the chances are good the child would have died or had permanent brain damage There ...


8

You know the scar is about a birth, but your little one doesn't. Children ask about scars, birthmarks and such all the time. Mine have never really wanted the whole entire details all at once. They indicate their interest by continuing the conversation after your first simple answer. Imagine if it was from your appendectomy or from a burn you got when you ...


7

To answer your overall question, whether the cesarean was necessary, the answer is "maybe". It sounds like there maybe have been fears of shoulder dystocia. Sometimes changing positions can help this problem, or something called the "Gaskin maneuver" The lithotomy position is the stereotypical birthing position in hospitals, but it is one of the worst ways ...


5

While I think this is a very complicated subject with no one good answer - both because each woman will have a different experience and each woman will benefit from different guidance - there is one answer to the question. The "relax" instruction is not in relation to pain management specifically, but rather in order to help allow the cervix to dilate. ...


5

This is a list based mostly on my experience... I've marked it as community wiki so others can add to it rather than accuumulating a lot of related similar answers. For pre-labour, for example if you are admitted for induction: Nightgown (preferred over pyjamas for ease of access for monitoring!) Eyemask, earplugs (hard to sleep in hospital) Plenty ...


5

While I did not plan for or want a cesarian section, my child was born via one. 1.Why are cases of normal delivery reducing day by day. Till about 10 to 15 yrs back we used to hardly hear about birth by operations. But now this is very common. You can find a lot of answers to this question depending on who you ask. The natural childbirth community may ...


5

There's a LOT of questions there. I'm going to handle the most important one first.. 5) Post birth the mother and the baby both are fine. But what are the risk involved post operation, and what best can be done to avoid such births in future (e.g some exercises?). Kegel exercises are the officially approved solution. As you might imagine, this is ...


5

It is the current practice at many medical facilities to automatically schedule a c-section for any child after a previous medically-necessary c-section. This is somewhat controversial, as the risks of VBAC (Vaginal Birth After C-Section) may be less than originally thought. Some studies show that between 74% and 82% of women attempting a trial of labor ...


4

What you are talking about is called vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC). You should do some research and decide if it's really the right thing for you. I don't see anything in there about two years, but that may be the obstetrician's experience. If you research and still think it's for you, your next step is probably to find an obstetrician and a ...


3

Child labor is already a physically-intensive activity. Intensely clenching muscles furthers the body's exhaustion. Since hamstring, quadricep, and back muscles are some of the largest muscles in the body, use of them can be more exhausting. Exhaustion can increase irritability, agitation, discomfort, among other undesirable effects. Furthermore, strongly ...


3

Note: Not a doctor, so this isn't medical advice. Consider what's basically going on; your body is attempting to build up a rhythm that will cause your child to exit in a calm and controlled fashion. The ideal process would be muscles smoothly grasping and shoving the baby down and out in one smooth motion. Obviously the issue here is that, because the ...


2

Yes, this is what contractions feel like (although they get closer together, shorter, and stronger in labour). These could be Braxton-Hicks contractions ("practice contractions") and just a sign that she needs to slow down and rest more and stay well-hydrated. You can also have days or weeks of what is called "prodromal labour" before the real thing ...


1

During the Pregnancy That depends entirely on your girlfriend. In my case, we bought a house about 7 weeks before my wife was due, so she couldn't do much, and I needed to do most of the homebuying myself. Fortunately for me, my wife was a researcher and was able to find support groups online (other people due the same month), so there wasn't too much that ...



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