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I also recommend 123 Magic. If your son is not listening or following directions just count him. Say "that's 1". You wait to see how he responds. Don't say anything else. If he stops fine if he continues the same behavior, you count him on 2. At 3 he receives a time out or punishment. Do not let your emotions get to you and do not hit your child.


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I am currently dealing with the same thing, and have been for a while now. The comments are harsh judgements like you think the asker was given a parenting handbook and that the information provided here is something that only idiots and bad parents don't know. I hear child development and education backgrounds, maybe some psychology/behavioral health. YOU ...


6

TL;DR: Make an appointment to see your doctor to discuss it. Most people are shocked when a child starts banging their heads. They are afraid the child might might hurt themself, or even have autism. In reality, head banging is relatively common (up to 20% of children have been headbangers at some point), is more common in males, often starts about nine ...


0

You say: I have asked all sorts of questions regarding behaviour problem syndromes to professionals who seem to dismiss this and say she is just very strong willed and maybe has an obsessive personality but so far have offered no help in combating or improving this. I don't know what country you live in, but you should be getting more support from ...


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I believe that it is about parents to show the interest and to show how important is the thing your kid does. For example, homework - it is really hard nowadays, education itself is getting harder and harder to deal with. Parents should show all this and emphasize it and to get actively involved in the studying life of their child. I found an interesting ...


2

Actually, my LO does this burrowing frantically and refuses to nurse. She has to have her face buried and me standing and walking around to soothe her alot. I was told they do this for reflux. (Even silent reflux) which also makes sense because she was recently diagnosed and is on Zantac. Rooting is completely different than what you're describing. If you ...


1

Update about the laughter, after some Google magic: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nervous_laughter Disclaimer: I'm Autistic and this is from personal experience. When I'm in a stressful situation or when I get nervous, my face will get extremely red and I will often start to laugh uncontrollably; it has costed me many friendships and it caused even more ...


4

"He does not obey anything I say, curses at me, calls me names, throws tantrums.." What this tells me is that your relationship with the kid still hasn't developed strong enough for the kid to trust you and open up to you about this problems. Rebelling is easy for kids because they don't know any better. The way to deal with this situation is to get the ...


6

I don't see how boot camp will help you. Unless it is solved relationally any improvement will probably only be temporary at best and fear driven at worst. Regardless, he needs to respect you. That's a simple fact. He's clearly trying to push you away, and it's a season where you have to not reject him and just stand firm in your love for him so he knows ...


23

At some point in your child's life they will do things not because you tell them to, but because they are the right thing to do. For example, a 40 year old pays their bills because in this society we pay our bills, not because their mother called and reminded them to pay their bills. As a parent, one of your tasks is to escort your child from the toddler ...


1

I took Child Development a couple years ago. This is a phase all children (yes, boys and girls) will go through as a self-soothing thing. The phase will stick around for a year or two then mostly vanish. It'll show back up in the teenage years. As for the force your son is using- he'll probably stop when it hurts.


6

It's hard to know the root cause of any behavior that's not medical, maybe because there is rarely one root cause. You have consulted your (pediatrician?) who said it wasn't medical. If you have concerns in that department, you can always get another opinion. If it's not medical, it's behavioral. If it's behavioral, you have the fun job of figuring out why ...


6

I see some aspects that might warrant considering; First, your son is six, that is an age where most children develop some rebellious tendencies, this is just part of getting older and comes with the "getting more independent" we parents encourage. Does this require action on your part? Not necessarily. Stay firm and consistent and you should be fine. ...


3

I'm not a child psychologist, but it sounds like he might be acting out due to changes in the household. Sit down and talk to your son. Establish that you aren't going to discipline him based on his answers, but want to understand why he has been acting out lately. Tell him if there is a problem you want to fix it, but can't if he doesn't tell you what is ...


1

First of all, I would find a pediatrician that takes your concerns seriously. Most babies are starting to sleep through the night at that age, and take a few naps during the day as well. This kind of sleep pattern isn't sustainable for either of you. Next, I would adjust his feeding schedule. You didn't say anything about timing and amounts, other than ...



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