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5

Personally, I'd handle a situation like that very much like you did. Trial and error, etc. I think a very important skill to have in life, but especially when parenting, is self-control. When our kids see us lose control, it forms an impression for them that "its ok" to lose control sometimes. Anyway, the one thing that I know I would have done after the ...


3

To me, this is where punishment-centric parenting doesn't really work well. It is indeed difficult to come up with good, immediate consequences or punishments that are directly related to the action ("Natural consequences"-based punishments), and other punishments at this age don't usually work very well. I see the issue as straightforward. She doesn't ...


3

Children with ADHD can be prone to depression, since much of the feedback or attention they get is negative -- either criticism for not focusing or trying hard enough, or a stressed parent pointing out that their lack of focus is now making everybody late. My son is younger, but has similar low motivation and poor self-esteem, as well as an ADHD diagnosis. ...


2

Having an older sister with disabilities must be tough. I'm guessing that she takes up a lot of your time, and in that he may have learnt that the more he slacks off, the more interest you take in him. It's one of these things that's just tough. It's no fault of yours; no-one in existence has the perfect upbringing and circumstances get in the way of that. ...


2

Your son needs to have direct, measurable consequences for such behavior. Typical punishments include time outs, losing privileges, natural consequences, and logical consequences. It can be hard to give time outs when in a car, but other consequences can be had. Your son is old enough to understand that current behavior can cause future punishments, so he ...


2

Based on the punishments you are applying (losing TV, deserts, etc.), it sounds like the punishments come long after she has misbehaved. The punishment may be too far removed time-wise to trigger any sort of hesitation in her. Since it sounds like she really hates the lack of freedom when you hold her hand, that can be a perfect logical consequence of her ...


1

It sounds like she already knows she's not allowed to run away, but the urge is stronger than the consequences, from her perspective. I would set up a safe way for her to satisfy her urge for "getting away", that might reduce her need to do it when it's less safe (when out and about). For example, put in a play house in the backyard that is only for her. ...



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