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6

First off, please don't worry! This is natural at this age and all children are like this in toddlerhood. My son, who is now 4, did the same thing with our cat at that age, and now he is very gentle and wonderful with cats. (My one year old has now entered that stage; our cat has passed, but she pulls on my 4 year old's hair and she finds it hilarious.) ...


4

I work in a school and the way we deal with this type of behaviour is to remind the child that they must use "kind hands" when playing with their friends. We set clear rules that if "kind hands" aren't used the child will then be removed from playing with their friend for 5 minutes and have to sit in silence away from everyone. Then they are introduced back ...


2

Children tend to go through phases where they strongly favor one parent, which seems to be happening to your daughter. Your daughter wants to maximize time and attention from her mother, that's why she protests if you do things with her that her mother would otherwise do. You're not doing anything wrong or different, you're just not mommy. This phase will ...


2

If her teacher is actually yelling at her, I'd be surprised if she didn't cry. I'd also consider finding another school. Teachers should never yell or shout at children. Parents shouldn't either, for that matter, though nobody is perfect, but I would expect teachers to be held to a higher standard in that regard. At three, yelling or shouting is going to ...


2

The "terrible 2's" is when children discover their emotions, and this sort of behaviour is very typical. Helping the child to recognize and identify their own emotions is key in this stage. If you can sit them down, talk to them, ask them how they feel and why they feel that way, it can help a lot. For example: "How do you feel right now - do you feel ...


1

I've been using Nonviolent Communication (NC) for some months and it works. I have a son who is 13 and a son who is 9 and mentally handicapped. NC helped me a lot and daily life is much more relaxed now. Here is how I apply it in my life: listen to his feelings don't judge: There is no "wrong" or "right". Only different opinions. If you want to give ...


1

Children do learn to modify their behaviour with different people, so its possible you can teach him to behave around you even if he still acts up for his grandparents. Try getting down to his level, insist that he makes eye contact, and say "I know you are upset about this. Thats fine. But screaming about it is not acceptable. If you carry on screaming you ...



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