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A great way to proceed here is to try and discover the source of your child's frustration. Some common sources of frustration: Has your child's routine recently changed? Is your child feeling jealous of the time you spend with his younger brother? Does he feel that he's unable to communicate his thoughts? Is your child getting enough rest during the ...


5

I agree that there are two intelligent beings here tying to influence the other. The problem is that one of them doesn't have the vocabulary yet to voice the transgression and frustration he feels. He is not being a manipulative little dictator at this stage; he's just expressing what he feels in a way that comes naturally to him. There is a double concern ...


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TL;DR: 1-2-3 Magic: Effective Discipline for Children 2–12 by Thomas W. Phelan Ah, the joys of parenting. You haven't said anything about if he has siblings, and if so, where is he in birth order, and how he treats them. Please allow me to go on a bit about ODD since it sounds like a possibility. ODD kids often: are very bright, get angry, argue with ...


2

My son was in a very similar situation two years ago. In addition to my follow up answer, I would like to add that the main thing we discovered is there was almost nothing we could do at home about his behavior at school. We offered everything from spectacular rewards down to harsh punishments for a year, to little avail. He stopped taking his frustration ...


2

It's important to remember that there are two intelligent human beings in this transaction, each trying to train the other. He's trying to train you to jump into action when he screeches. If you want to reinforce this behavior, reward it by giving him what he's screaming for. If you want to extinguish it, you'll have to ignore it and reward other, less ...


2

My son and your son are about the same age (mine is 6 1/2--he'll be 7 in February), and with school, Choi Kwong Do, and Cub Scouts, he goes to bed pretty exhausted every night. There is no time for naptime during the school year and he doesn't seem to want a nap. But every so often if he's been up extremely late the night before (like, at a sleepover) or ...


2

I'll do a quick read across from my examples and see what helps: My son has always needed 4-6 hours sleep a day. My middle daughter won't fall asleep until late (and gets up late) and my youngest can fall asleep at any time, but is an early riser. So for my middle daughter, she was already into 1.5 to 2 hours training every evening after school, whether it ...


2

This is still getting views, so I thought I would post my own follow-up answer. In retrospect, it was quite obvious that his behavior issues were much more frequent than most children. Rather than adjusting to the rules and eventually settling in like his classmates, our son's behavior issues at school increased in severity and frequency. A year later, he ...


1

When I read your first paragraph, I thought, "yep, that's my little one, too." However, I was very surprised to see how quickly he's labeled ODD. I never thought my child had ODD. I thought she was just being an energetic young child, doing everything she could to explore the world, including finding out what breaks, what triggers mom+dad, what limits she ...


1

Ask your pediatrition. Those words are often used by teachers to tell you they suspect ADD. Teachers are not medical professionals so are not supposed to suggest your child might have a particular medical problem. So a teacher is not supposed to say, "I think your child may have ADD."



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