Hot answers tagged

16

This is absolutely normal - she has discovered a new toy: her voice. At this age she doesn't really know anything about the effect loud shouts can have on others. And even when you ask her to stop, that is only a short term thing. But this will come with time - I'd suggest keeping on doing as you are now. If you make too big a thing of it, sometimes ...


3

The first thing that comes to mind is that your son learned he doesn't have to do unpleasant things if he pretends not to understand. So "Do you want a cookie?" gets a response, "Don't touch the glass!" doesn't. It might even be a certain tone of voice (for example, the one your wife uses when she wants him to do something) that's become a cue for him to ...


3

It is in our nature to be jealous. I noticed similar problems with my kiddos. However, I then noticed how I "congratulated" them and such, and realized I was creating the jealousy. I've since switched to a "right on, the more you practice the better you both will get" kind of accolade for almost all situations. Even when it is just 1 kid doing something ...


3

We used to call one of my nephews The Pterodactyl Child, until we nipped that bud: Inside voice, please. (yes, even if sometimes we are outside) I only have one niece, so I may be off-base, but IME (and my mother's, who holds a masters degree in special education) females develop sooner and begin the "terrible twos" at around that age. Good luck :)


3

There is something you can do. Instead of only reacting with the "serious" look and "no", sometimes mimic her back! At times when it is least disturbing to others. It might be engaging and fun. And she might learn something even more, like when the shouting is more appropriate and fun, and when it ought to be toned down. Additional benefit: meaningful (to ...


2

We use a 'double check'. Sometimes he doesn't understand what it actually means when he says yes/no, so I confirm what he meant by explaining what will happen next. Example: Me: Are you done with your dinner? Toddler: Yes! Me: Ok, then I am going to take your food away (or even better: Can I eat your food? This really drives home that he is not having ...


2

Children that age learn new things everyday, some good some bad. Trust me it is only a phase and will pass soon. What you can do meanwhile is not give her extra attention when she shouts i.e. don't tell her it is bad or to stop, simply try to distract her with a toy she likes or a book or whatever else she likes. UPDATE: All the people advising a 'firm ...


2

One of my favorite diving games growing up was "penny fetch". My folks would toss coins into the pool and we were supposed to go down to fetch them. Sometimes they would toss the higher denominations (dimes, quarters) into the deep end. Since we sometimes got to keep the money we had incentive to learn to swim underwater. Obviously harder to do in a ...


2

My answer works on excited adults too: speak very softly to her and she'll speak softly too. Kids learn by mimicry. As soon as she's old enough to understand you can add; "the people over there don't want to hear that" or (my favourite) "that baby over there wants to sleep, please don't be so loud".


1

It's good to consider any challenges such as hearing or a neurological issue, but barring those I highly recommend you take a Love & Logic class and use the power of empathetic consequences. Also the "uh oh" song, as appropriate.


1

Yes, you should go to the doctor. My daughter had very similar symptoms - it'd seem like she'd be straining or cramping, then it would pass and she'd be fine. Our pediatrician said "well, might be nothing but... Here let's do a consult with someone..." Ended up being intestinal intussuseption that required a procedure to correct. It's usually a good idea ...


1

It just a phase; one of the random things she learned elsewhere. But how you handle it when she screams might be the reason why she keeps screaming. I try to refrain myself from criticizing other people's parenting methods. But I can tell you hitting is not a good way, it probably will work due to pain; but the only thing you are teaching your child is ...


1

Say OW. She's probably hurting people's ears a little, though she doesn't exactly understand that yet. But even at her age, she probably knows that "OW" signals pain. It's up to you to show her that her behavior is no good because it causes pain in others. It's also probably ok to exaggerate for effect in this case, even if it doesn't cause you physical ...


1

This is very normal. However, in my experience, your plan will likely not work out. The problem is not her screaming, it's her disobedience. If she stops screaming but continues to grow in disobedience, you will likely still be displeased. Fortunately, there is something else you can do. If you oppose corporal punishment on principal, ignore this answer. I ...


1

This sounds like classic ADHD symptoms, because it sounds like I was when I was that age to a scary degree. My son feeds on bad attention. Personally, when I was acting like this, I just wanted any kind of attention. I found that if I misbehaved (trying to kiss the girls, throwing sand, interrupting the teacher), I got the attention that I wanted. ...


1

I believe the police department handles assault and battery. I'm sorry. I know it's your daughter, but when we progress to using weapons to convey threats and we're perceiving these threats as legitimate, you have a responsibility to your other daughter to do something about this immediately. Failure to act in the best interests of your other daughter could ...


1

I shall take you through what I do, this is a reasonably time consuming approach but i also have two ASD children (for a total of 7) so there are nine of us to feed each day. Plan a week's menu out ahead of time. Each day have two options; let the child pick from the two options before you go shopping, so you are buying the one they have decided on. If ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible