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8

Its hard to say without more detailed information, but it sounds like your girlfriend needs to change the way she deals with the children. Hence I suggest: 1: Get her to see that there is a problem. 2: Get her to see that she can do something about it. 3: Agree a course of action between yourselves and carry it out. If she won't back you up then nothing ...


3

Any suggestions Consider going on a parenting course. Webster Stratton is one which is well known and used often in the UK. In the US there's the Wonder Years programme. http://incredibleyears.com/programs/parent/ The Incredible Years® evidence based parenting programs focus on strengthening parenting competencies and fostering parent involvement ...


3

THIS GIRL NEEDS IMMEDIATE PROFESSIONAL HELP. Picking up the knife, presumably in a threatening manner, indicates serious instability. This is not a run-of-the-mill teenage emotional outburst. She is quite possibly a danger to someone else or to herself. She effectively threatened homicide or suicide. This young lady needs to be evaluated by a medical ...


3

I'd probably recommend Tai Chi over karate, but you should try out different styles and see if anything "clicks" with him. If he is reluctant, show him the recent remake of the Karate Kid. I'd imagine he would be able to identify with the protagonist, and it might motivate him, as it has enough "violence" to appeal to him, but the message of the movie ...


3

To answer one of your questions: Yes Karate is the right thing to do. One of the main principles of Karate is control. You learn that through Karate you have real skills to hurt people and it is your responsibility to not abuse that power. A good Karate teacher should go over how wrong it would be to use your (as in your nephew) skills to harm someone who ...


3

One of the keys in step parenting, as I've read elsewhere, is one-on-one time. If you think about it, the problems you describe are rooted in two or more of them and their mother ganging up against you. You've got to have an extended time with each of them alone, completely away from the others and away from their mother -- shopping, movie, sports, fishing, ...


2

There's a few considerations here. First and foremost is that you aren't their Dad, you're their mother's boyfriend. This means parenting strategy is her responsibility and not yours, and you need to take your cues from her. If you step in and start trying to parent them it might cause friction between you and her. Take her lead, she knows them better than ...


2

...we don't have a good relationship with her and so there isn't any communication about behaviour between my other half and the ex. This is common enough, but not really in the best interests of the child. Is there a possibility that she's picking up a bad attitude about her dad from her mother? If she is, then the choice is to either stick it out ...


2

I hate to say this but I am 10 years into something similar. Run, don't walk! It will not get better, matter of fact it's guaranteed to get worse with age. I am now plagued with anger issues, mental break downs, depression, so much more. I hate to sound so negative but it is the truth. Save yourself before there is nothing left to save :/ I love the kids, I ...


1

Even though you're not their father, and you can never be their father, you should love them like they're your children and be a father for them if you want to be with their mother. You cannot have their mother without them. When you got serious with her, you got serious with all of them. It won't be easy, but as suggested, you should spend one-to-one time ...


1

I think a key point that I didn't see being touched on is, what is wrong with telling them the truth about why you want them to do or not do something. I agree with everyone that says, telling your kids a lie about a monster getting them or that the police will get them, will possibly lead your child to believe lying is okay to get what you want and also ...


1

I've noticed there are a few different types of tantrums. One is where the child is truly frustrated that you don't understand what they're asking for. By default I initially try to assume it's this first. There's no worse feeling for both child and parent than when you ignore a tantrum and they are simply frustrated because they can't tell you they ...


1

I find it best to let them discover swear words on their own. When you start to hear it talk to your child and let them know the correct situations to swear(hurt, bad grade, ECT). I would not encourage it but definitely do not discourage it. If you do this they will tend to swear even more than they would. Swearing has never affected my education or career ...



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