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13

Sorry this is so long. TL;DR: You can fix this, and do even better than that. You can become a great dad! We always want our children to learn the consequences of their behaviors, believing that it's one of life's most valuable lessons. Now it's your turn to face consequences. There are no quick fixes. You have given your eldest ample evidence that he ...


6

This situation is going to recur for years. Develop a long-term strategy for dealing with it based on what is best for your son, not necessarily what is fair. At this age, he's not going to learn any significant lesson from any behavior you choose as long as it's not frightening to him. There are plenty of reasons to stop someone from snatching a toy: value ...


4

You two are going through a lot recently... stay strong! On topic: I can see a bit where the "weird" comes from in your daughters mind (because to her, it certainly is weird, or at least strange), but where did she pick up the "dirty"? You said she picked up the meaning on the internet: what kind of sites did she find? Her first landing may have heavily ...


3

The natural consequence of teasing/arguing/fighting with your sibling is that you are teasing/arguing/fighting with your sibling, and this means that one or both of you are unhappy or hurt. The instigating sibling is also teaching the other what they think is an acceptable way to interact with siblings. Therefore, they can expect the other sibling to use the ...


3

I applaud your intention. Please note that my answer here does not take into account what may be appropriate in your culture as I am not familiar with its norms. First to consider is that she is your step daughter. My experience being a step child is that the step parent has no where near the same respect as the biological parent. Working with her ...


3

There's nothing you really can do, aside from just treating him right going forward. He's still very young, and kids are more resilient than most adults give them credit for. However, you shouldn't expect to be able to undo something in less time than it took to do it. That being said, parents tend to overestimate the influence they have on their ...


2

Comfort objects are completely normal for small children. Does that mean he fears something? Is he feeling insecure or something?http://scholar.google.co.uk/scholar?q=~child+%22transitional++objects%22 Yes, probably - but that's ok. If he had no fears - of anything at all - then that would be distinctly abnormal. Growing up in the big world is ...


2

First off, your daughter is still great. The worth of a child is not measured by their behavior. I can't address the peeing with the information provided. Is she potty trained already? Is she in Pull-Ups? If she's refusing to obey you, for whatever reason, I have a hard time believing it's the first time. Regardless, the solution is discipline. If she ...


2

Another thing to keep in mind is that time and cause and effect are very fluid concepts (as NoAnswer said, abstract) in the minds of children. They don't, in general, understand the idea of "just a minute" or "in a moment." They have a need/want, and either it's satisfied or it isn't. They don't have a "progress bar." One thing I see a lot of first-time ...


2

The other parent seems to have taken a cue from you.* You didn't say anything and let the her deal with it, which sends the message that it doesn't bother you on behalf of your son. And when that happens repeatedly, the simpler path for her to take was just let her child have the toy -- that way, it doesn't get stolen anymore and she doesn't have to ...


2

I have several boys and girls of wildly varying age. When we had our first child my wife and I thought that differences based on gender are all due to the environment, and that we would never let this happen to our children. Now, several children later, I laugh at this. One of the things that set my boys apart from my girls is that the girls consistently ...


2

This sounds like a pretty classic case of "night terrors", named not because the baby is terrified, but because he appears to be terrified. Typically, it is seen in preschoolers (as early as 5 month, but peaks at 3.5 years of age) occurs at the same time after falling asleep every night in the early part of sleep happens during deep non-REM sleep when ...


2

Focusing on the second paragraph, as I think more information is needed for the first. Also, given you didn't describe how you discipline your children, don't take this as criticizing your specific discipline; instead, this is more generally "why do kids often ask why they are bad". Many forms of discipline can very easily lead a child to internalize ...


1

I firmly believe that when a parent brings their child to a shared play area or play group, then they confer to the rest of the attending guardians the right to interact with that child. (I also believe that each attending guardian has a shared responsibility to ensure the safety of the children and the surrounding property.) In this case, if another child ...


1

One of the most important concerns for a young child is to not have the things they are using taken away from them. Allowing another kid to take your child's toy is not sending the message you need to share it sends the message you cannot be confident that I will protect your right to keep using the toy. You need to take the toy back from the other child ...


1

We found the best way to foster independence was to give independence. We gave our kids the chance to make their own decisions independent of us by leaving them as often as possible. Birthday parties? The parents of the birthday boy will be there supervising, so we'd leave. Soccer? The coach is there, and he probably doesn't want parents coaching from the ...


1

This is perfectly normal, healthy behaviour for your child. He watches you in order to learn from you. Please don't do anything to make him feel this behaviour is in any way wrong. Simply go about your tasks with your little shadow in tow. Please don't take this the wrong way, but perhaps it would be worthwhile for you to try to understand your own apparent ...


1

To the first question: I don't think your son's behavior had a creepy vibe. He was clever when it came to finding a way to unlock the door (something I figured out how to do around his age, but usually with paperclips or the inner part of a pen). After such an accomplishment, I wouldn't be surprised if he were trying to prove that he could get in the room no ...


1

I, too, am struggling with the uncontrolled laughter of my 22 year old son with ASD. He has always laughed occasionally at inappropriate times, but now he is older, more is expected of him, and it is very disruptive at school and at home. He, too, laughs when I get angry at him--I do believe that anger is a frightening emotion for people on the spectrum ...


1

I guess its normal. Even.when i was a teen, I used to keep my pillow next to me and used to sleep by hugging it. But mostly it was to reduce my anxiety and provide comfort. Yeah.. So its normal ( hopefully, oe else I am not normal lol)


1

I agreed with many of the points offered with the most upvoted answers, but I felt that they all could include something more. I believe that having a detailed budget is the biggest aide in becoming financially independent and stable. You need to know how much many you have coming in, and how much money you have going out. Other answers have suggested ...



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