Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

More light, and take away the association with the sun. Basically, try to get them to respond to light when you want the day to be. About an hour before the sun sets, close any curtains etc and turn all the lights in the house on (and, if possible, TVs and extra lights). This will increase the "perception" of daytime, and remove the "Oh look, the sun's ...


2

It might be worth a blood test. Excessive tiredness could be a sign of vitamin D deficiency or low iron. Our son suffered both even though he is a carnivore living in a sunny place (Australia).


6

We got our kids (7 and 8) an alarm clock and said "You're not allowed to get out of bed until the alarm goes off." For us the issue is a little different. They have no trouble staying in bed on school days, but on Saturday mornings they have been known to wake us up at 5 AM, no matter what time they went to bed. They wind up playing quietly in their room ...


3

That sounds very natural! All other diurnal life does this too. And you would too if it weren't for electricity and light bulbs. The circadian rhythm, levels of melatonin, serotonin are dictated by the eye's first exposure to UV light from the sun. The approximate 16 hour time clock countdown to sleep starts at first light exposure for the eye. A full day of ...


4

I deeply sympathize. We have the same problem in deep winter, and gets to be something of an opposite problem in summer (staying up because the sun hasn't set yet)... Specifically for short days, some possible ideas: Look into indoor extracurricular activities like gymnastics, martial arts, music lessons, whatever he might enjoy. If it starts around 5 or ...


1

Our foster kids are 7 and 8 and we're still figuring things out but here's what I've found that make a difference: Absolutely no chocolate after 4 PM. They need a lot of exercise during the day to be physically tired. Soft music. We actually have this goofy iPad app called Jazz Radio set to Smooth Jazz. Fiddle with the lights. Sometimes they need the ...


0

All my children around that age had a certain time that was just right. Put them to bed early and they would be too excited to sleep until way after their bedtime. Put them to bed too late and they would stay up late, too. What time this was depended a lot on the children, age, and time of year. (In winter, when it's dark early, they are tired, and sleep ...


2

My son was a bed wetter until he was 8 and his father and I split. I mean it stopped as soon as he left. Maybe stress?


1

It really should pass, however I know that the addition of shame can prolong and even make the issue worse. Waking her up with break up her sleep and make her more tired. My experience is that bedwetting is best solved with rewards and celebration of success. Ultimately if it continues to 10+years old there may be trauma that is contributing to the ...


0

Anyone considered speaking to your gp or school nurse about this? My daughter was about 7-8 yrs old when I stsrted having issues with her not sleeping, she would sing, talk to herself, read books out loudly etc, I finally got her seen by the doctor and sge was referred to a phycologist who ran some tests and we discovered my daughter has severe adhd ...



Top 50 recent answers are included