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46

When legally adult children continue to live with their parents, they implicitly accept to live by the rules of the house because they are legally free to choose to move out and live by their own rules. The times you mention seem on the conservative side to me. I'm sure your parents mean well but if you want to change things then I would start by figuring ...


37

I would keep doing it as long as the child is interested in it, and might even press the issue a while later. Jim Trelease is an advocate of reading aloud thoughout (at least) the elementary years, and his research is compelling. He has published collections of stories and book recommendations that are age appropriate as children grow up. This story of a ...


24

I'd say keep reading the bedtime stories for as long as your child is willing to let you! It is not only a great opportunity for parent-child bonding, but it also fosters an appreciation of reading. Eventually you'll reach a point where they feel they're "too old" for that, and I suspect you'll wind up missing that ritual. If the stories themselves are ...


22

I was a foster parent for a year. I met parents who were unequivocally abusive. One thing I took from that experience is that the term "abusive" is applied way too frequently to normal parents who at worst are making honest mistakes and at best just have a different parenting style. It dilutes the impact of the word, and in my opinion dishonors truly ...


21

It is important to recognize that even though we, as adults, know that there are no such things as ghosts, to the child they are real. And no amount of logic will convince them otherwise. You have to accept, for a while, that what they think is real, is actually real, and then you can deal with making it not scary. So rather than trying to reverse their ...


19

You didn't specify how you put him to bed, so here are a few suggestions. I think the infant will feel abandoned if you just put him down without a word, and then simply remove your hands, and then leave the room. I don't imply that you do, but it's a contrast. Have you tried to: Make soothing sounds ("sssshhhhh...") before, while, and after you put him ...


17

Kids vary. Some take to the bed without any real difference from how they went to sleep in the crib, and others are all "oooh, freedom!" and getting up every ten seconds for a cuddle or a drink or to see what you are up to. For the "oooh, freedom!" type, here's what I do: First of all, make sure a good, solid, consistent bedtime routine is in place. Put ...


16

It's difficult for everyone when a child is fighting sleep. Everyone is tired, which makes it hard to be patient (for parents) or obedient (for children). Parents are desperate for even a few minutes of quiet, private, intimate time, and that time is quickly evaporating as the child keeps bouncing around. Recognize that alarm clocks and strict scheduling of ...


14

Our daughter used exactly the same tactic (altough it was only in early morning) Do not give in on letting her into your bed. I think this is a thing to be consequent about. You will have to be strict and clear: calling you out of bed to go to potty is ok, doing this to get into your bed is not. Under no circumstances she should be allowed to use this as a ...


14

As a teacher, librarian and parent, I can tell you that there is no end to the benefits of reading to your children. I would encourage that you continue reading aloud with your children even into high school. Beyond the valuable bonding time it provides you with your child it allows for a number of educational benefits. First, even when a child can read, ...


14

Another explanation could be psychological. Hear me out, it sounds far fetched but makes sense. Yawning is contagious because a group's social ties are strengthened using such mechanisms. This can be seen across many species of pack animals, and humans belong in that category. So when you want your kids to sleep, you are putting yourself in a suitable ...


13

I was once told keep the kids in the crib until they start trying to get out. That is kind of what we did. We switched our daughter to a bed at about 2.5 years and the main reason we did that is because we were preparing for her to share a room with her little sister and her sister needed the crib. My daughter took right to it. She rarely ever gets out of ...


13

Check out this article and its sources, the combination has a lot of depth. I'll summarize some of the high points. The excessive stress from crying it out reduces long term coping skills for stress. The article I link can lead to a fear of being alone, separation anxiety, panic attacks and addictions as well as a 10 times greater chance of the child ...


13

"My rules or get out" is not a good way to teach children to compromise (and we hear that rhetoric so often when being critical of how a country is run, where this is learned I see clearly now..) or negotiate with other adults. You risk casting your children to the wolves, and I've seen friends devoured. In this case, you should be able to calmly sit down ...


13

The key here is Don't Read Books You Don't Enjoy. Peter: [reading a review of a boxing match in a hushed, storytelling way] The champ caught Smith with a savage left hook... Michael: What are you reading her? Peter: [responding to Michael in same tone] It doesn't matter what I read, it's the tone you use. She doesn't understand the words ...


13

This is not as dangerous as you think. Make sure your child is sleeping on a relatively firm surface, without squishy bumpers on the sides, and the baby will be fine. But still, when you put your child to sleep, start with the the back. Yes SIDS is a real danger, and there are indeed studies that show the risk increases when the baby sleeps on his stomach. ...


12

According to the US. Department of Health & Human Services brochure on sleep positioning for infants: Studies show that, during early infancy, it is unusual for a baby who is placed in the back sleep position to roll onto his or her stomach.20 However, once infants are more developmentally advanced, they often roll over on their own. In this ...


11

In general, I would do the same thing to an 18 year old as any of my kids. They gradually get more freedom to set their own bed time, computer usage, etc, until they are sleeping in, not getting things done, etc. If they blow it, then they are on a tight schedule (For some time, I was sending them to bed at 1900, because they were having serious problems ...


11

When our son started doing this, we took the following tack: With very rare exceptions, we make sure he takes a nap. Sleep begets sleep, and a skipped nap in the middle of the day just means he'll be more tired, cranky, and (perversely) wound up at the end of the day. Our escalating scenarios for the nap are a walk around the block in the stroller, ...


10

I think @deworde has the best advice to help motivate you to read stories. However, I wanted to add an answer that mentions options other than reading. Until they are about six months old, babies will rely on tone of voice and sentence patterns to help learn to understand you. The more you interact with them, the better they'll be able to learn how to ...


9

Routine - routine - routine. My youngest daughter, now 13 was an extreme night owl. She would rarely fall asleep before 2am when she was a toddler. What I found out through trial and error was that if we put her to bed at exactly the same time each night, her body got used to it. Give her a ritual before going to bed, do it the same way each night. Once ...


9

I don't like answering my own questions, but the only other answer didn't really apply, so here goes: "Letting him cry" didn't work for us. We discovered that the cause was discomfort rather than defiance, although not in a very obvious way. Our son's bedtime unrest and crying has been increasing recently, and it now turns out that he didn't want the ...


9

Kids go through periods where sleep is hard to come by from time to time. I would suggest taking a few steps with him. First. Does he have a routine for bed-time still? They still need a calming ritual. My own daughter is allowed to read to herself for about twenty minutes and then she has to turn the light out to try sleeping. Next, Ask him what ...


9

If you want your child to understand language, you have to talk to your child. A study was done on the differing number of words per hour spoken to a child in low income, middle class, and professional families. The difference was startling. A low income child would hear 600 words per hour. A middle class child 1200. A professional class child 2100. A ...


9

First, you are not withholding comfort. You are allowing them to express themselves in a way which requires them to handle the issue without forming a dependency. Being comforting is not the same thing for every child and every situation. For relatives, they likely have children. That being the case, I'd ask them if any 2 of the children were able to be ...


8

The single best solution we've found so far with our 3.5 year old is two fold: no more afternoon naps, or at least cut them down shorter. If it's taking 2 hours for him to get to sleep after bed time, then cut 2 hours out of the nap. (he was taking 4 and 5 hour naps some days, then bouncing off the walls until 10:30 or 11 at night.) get them out and active ...


8

I wrote an answer to a similar question: have a solid bedtime routine put the kid to bed and say good night, then leave the room. Repeat as needed. It helped me much to accept that my son doesn't fall asleep right away. When I put him to bed, there's not total darkness, and I tell him it's okay to not sleep yet but he must relax and wind down. He can sit ...


8

The physical development needed to avoid bedwetting doesn't come in as quickly as that needed to stay dry during the day. It's quite normal for a child to wet at night long after being toilet trained. The Mayo Clinic says bedwetting as late as 7 years old isn't cause for concern.. Reprimanding a child for something she can't physically control yet isn't ...


8

We just upgraded our toddler from a crib to a toddler bed, and we were concerned for the same reasons. There are a few toys and lots of books in her room, and we weren't sure how she would do. I guess we got lucky because she didn't have any problem staying in bed as she was falling asleep. However, she usually wakes up 30-60 minutes before we get her out ...



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