Hot answers tagged

6

One common suggestion is a pool noodle under the edge of the mattress sheet. It will not prevent a very aggressive or active roller from escaping and can still be climbed over at will, but if she's just tossing and turning it should keep her on the mattress.


5

We had the same issue with our daughter and we had to improvise. The Bedrail is designed to use with a bed however it works perfectly with a mattress only. It's a stretchy net so even if the baby pushes hard it'll push him/her back gently. The frame is made of very light plastic parts so even if it falls on the baby for any reason it won't her him/her ...


3

It might no be the most "accepted" thing to do, but my kids slept with the wife and me from day one. In many ways, this is equivalent to a toddler bed since as soon as they were mobile they could get out of bed. So no time is too early. Our solution to the height issue was to scrap the bed and just have a mattress. Just make sure there is nothing she can get ...


3

Contrary to what you might think, children sleep well with a certain level of noise, especially if it's the familiar sounds of the family doing whatever they usually do or the voices of people they trust. It can be very reassuring, especially for smaller children. That's the reason some parents leave bedroom doors open a small crack: You hear the baby/child, ...


3

Since you have described the rolling out of bed as harmless, your real question seems to be about how to prevent your child from getting cold (and waking up) due to having lost their blanket. Until they are old enough to solve the lost blanket situation without help, you can use an infant sleeping bag for your child. Such a garment is considerably harder ...


2

As with so many "resistance" problems, the answer, hard as it may be for parents to go with, is "natural consequences". In this case, she goes to school in her pajamas and Doona. (Just tell the teacher what's up.) ETA a rationale and a caveat: Caveat: make sure it is actually just resistance (power play) and not a genuine fear to something bad/hidden going ...


2

We switched both of ours to toddler beds between 18 and 20 months, so that's certainly not "too young" in my opinion and experience. Switching to a toddler bed in our case was driven by necessity: both of ours could climb out of the crib by that age. If your daughter can't climb out of the crib yet, you certainly don't need to, but that's not to say you ...


2

The first thing I'd do is figure out whether she's having trouble getting out of bed because she's too tired. Most kids I've known fall into one of two camps: the ones that wake up on their own and are bright and chippy nearly right away, usually too much so for the parents; and the ones who don't wake up on their own, have to be woken up, and are very ...


1

The “Checklist” strategy worked very well for us. For my 7-year-old, we created a few checklists including the following items: Items to do every morning until she is ready for school Items to do when she is back from school Items to do before going to bed I ask her to create the checklist with her handwriting. If she cannot write YET visual stickers or ...


1

It's good you are looking out for your brother! Hey, tell him don't worry about it... he'll grow out of it someday. Lots of kids do that, and boys are notorious. So, don't worry about, just put some things in place to protect him and the bed, like a protective cover, and some towels, etc. Then, make sure no more fluids after a certain time (depending on ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible