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25

Having one's own room can be nice, but it's never a necessity. It's only in the last generation or two that it became common to give children separate bedrooms instead of just having a boys' room and a girls' room.


20

Our dentist made sure to ask, at my child's first visit, whether we let him go to bed with milk or a bottle/sippy cup. He said that he deals with a lot of kids who have rotting teeth due to milk sitting on them all night, and/or badly misaligned teeth due to nighttime sippy-cup chewing. His recommendations were as follows: Children with teeth should be ...


20

If you have 3 rooms for the children, then give each their own room, but with one condition that when guests sleep over, they must give up one room for the guests. That room should be the 20-year-old's because she's the only one not using it full-time in the first place. She's also the only legally adult person whom you are not obliged to house. Do not ...


17

Kids vary. Some take to the bed without any real difference from how they went to sleep in the crib, and others are all "oooh, freedom!" and getting up every ten seconds for a cuddle or a drink or to see what you are up to. For the "oooh, freedom!" type, here's what I do: First of all, make sure a good, solid, consistent bedtime routine is in place. Put ...


13

I was once told keep the kids in the crib until they start trying to get out. That is kind of what we did. We switched our daughter to a bed at about 2.5 years and the main reason we did that is because we were preparing for her to share a room with her little sister and her sister needed the crib. My daughter took right to it. She rarely ever gets out of ...


11

Are they explicitly saying this, or are you assuming they're implying it, because you're in a 2 bedroom house? I can only speak for the US, so YMMV, but legally speaking, housing supports up to two people per room. In your situation this means that they can give you a 2 bedroom place and tell you to deal with it, but they can't give you a 1 bedroom place. ...


10

Same-sex siblings don't need separate rooms, at least not if they're roughly the same age. Sharing a room teaches valuable social lessons. It's more a matter of how well they get along in general, and how much space you can afford. I wouldn't put a 2-year-old in a room with a 12-year-old though, or two siblings that terrorize each other.


8

Interesting question, and there's no one answer. We chose separate rooms for our two girls, but then they decided a few months ago - at three and five - to move in together. They seem to prefer to sleep in company, but they can keep each other awake sometimes, which led to sleep shortages (and tantrums!) with the younger one until we separated bedtime by ...


8

Instead of a weekly job fit only for Hercules, we incorporate clean-up into our daily bedtime routine: clean up, brush teeth, shower/bath, pyjamas, bedtime story, nighty-night. It's not negotiable, it's communal (we all help clean up), and it's supervised (he can't play anymore once clean-up starts), so it goes fairly smoothly and is usually over in ...


7

My daughter was insistent on taking a drink to bed for a long time, probably from a similar age until she was about 4. Unfortunately, once we'd finally decided to intervene (I think a few months before she turned 3), it was way too late and had reached the stage where it was a pretty fixed routine for her; breaking it was very difficult. Our refusal of a ...


7

As a parent of two young daughters (2 years old and 3 weeks old), I know how tough it can be dealing with putting your child in another room. Essentially, the reasons you keep your child in your room are out of convenience (you don't have to trudge to the other room just to change a diaper or breast feed) and genuine concern (if something happens in the ...


7

We had our daughter in our room until she was 6 months, our son until he as 9 months. The benefits we found were: Night time feeds are a lot easier - it is a lot easier to get the baby when they are a few feet away. You only have to heat one room. If the missus needs help for some reason, you are already there. You can hear you child breathing, thus tend ...


6

Despite joking, @monsto has a point - children are children, and their motivation may be very strange to us... But I would guess that your child is staying in bed because he thinks that is what you want him to do. Perhaps he has over-interpreted instructions that he should go to bed, or does he have a sibling who was told off for getting up early, or ...


5

I only have brothers, so my situation was slightly different, yet the solution might be a good one. While I was away at school, the bedroom was given to one of my brothers who had never had his own room with the understanding that he would return to his previous room with our other brother any time I was home. The room was his and we had to negotiate him ...


5

I believe the implication behind your question is that toilet training might be harder if a child is more likely to need to go during the night - and I am not sure that is always right. My own experience with four children (one still going through this process!) leads me to believe it is a mental battle rather than a physical one - my aim was to train our ...


4

We went through a similar stage with our 2-year old (for very similar reasons). I don't think it has caused any particular longer term problems subsequently. We would often go in once she was asleep and remove it, so there wouldn't be any problems with rolling over and waking her up in the wee small hours. We tried to also leave it on the beside ...


4

I guess this answer is just as suitable here: As long as they want to. Eventually they'll want their private space for various reasons, certainly when puberty kicks in. Anecdote: a set of boy/girl twins I know shared a room until age 9 and that worked well. I'm not aware of the separation reason; whether it was just an opportunity like in your question, or ...


4

Our eldest two (boy and girl two years apart) shared a room until our third child was successfully sleeping and at that point we put her in with her sister, so our boy gets one room and the girls get a bigger room together. We stagger sleep times so our youngest goes to bed around 30 minutes before her sister, and our eldest is about another 30 minutes ...


4

Welcome, and congratulations on the expected family addition! In my home, there's no changing table in the baby room. Instead, we have a changing station in the bathroom. Our washing machine is right next to the sink, and on top of the machine we have a padded thing like this: On the wall above the washing machine, there is a cupboard where we ...


4

No, you're not wrong in what you did. I think your approach made sense. It sounds like the problem is rather a lack of agreement between the parents. As DA01 commented, this could be just a symptom of a deeper underlying disagreement. So instead of looking at this particular issue, try to focus on what might be the root cause underneath it. Your post ...


4

The Situation in General We all experiment with different methods when we first begin to parent. Sometimes you play with lines that should never be crossed. Sometimes you do things in the best interest of the child's future health and well being, even though it may not seem advantageous, helpful, or healthy in the present. While I can't speak to locking a ...


3

Birth to Five, a book from the UK National Health Service, says that milk or water is okay to drink at night. http://www.nhs.uk/Planners/birthtofive/Pages/Caringforchildsteeth.aspx At bedtime or during the night, give your baby milk or water rather than baby juices or sugar-sweetened drinks. Water is probably better. But there is another reason to ...


3

The temperature part of this question is tricky, because different children are comfortable with different temperatures, just like adults. For example, each of our children have been different as far as getting too hot or too cold. We have 18mo twins, and we have to dress our boy more warmly than our daughter. My 3yo sweats considerably during the first ...


3

I would say a good room temperature is less than 20 degrees Celcius (68 F), but not below 17C (62.6 F) unless the child has a blanket and does not remove it while sleeping. We do this at home by simply not heating the sleeping rooms in the winter. Summer is a problem, and we don't have air conditioning. As for humidity we don't monitor it and we have no ...


3

He defiantly won't want to stay in the bed once you make the switch... but he'll get used to is. You can always put a gate on his room so he can get out of bed but not out the room without your help. My twins are 19 months, and making the switch this month,


3

As one of 5 I shared a room with 1 brother and a sister for many years, then as elder siblings began to leave home we all started to get our own rooms:-) My suggestion - make do with whatever space you have. If they fight and you can't solve that problem, then it may make sense to split them up, but otherwise it will depend on the space you have in your ...


3

Ours was a lot like this one (image from englishforum.ch), only once the kids got older the changing table bit was removable to leave it as an ordinary chest of drawers. The best bit for me (as I have a slightly dodgy back) is the overhang, meaning I could get very close while changing the babies, reducing my need to lean forwards.


3

We did not use a change table for our two kids. We just set up an area on the floor next to the crib with a towel and a plastic change mat on top. The wipes, plastic bags, nappies and such were located next to the change area. We had tried using a change table but found the floor was much easier. you don't have to worry about the child rolling off while ...


3

When we call him he gets out of bed, opens the door himself and comes and find us. Why doesn't he do it without the call? Has anyone come across this? Any ideas? Yes. The answer is that your child is 3. Lets reinforce this a bit. Here, your mileage may vary because I'm going by my memory of my own kids and NOT some established parameter for a ...


3

In our experience, it's very hard to get an infant to sleep without nursing if he/she is in the same room as Mommy, as the infant knows where the milk comes from. We didn't sleep train, but certainly when we needed to share a room (such as during hotel stays) it was much harder to get our sons to sleep as babies than when they were in a separate room. It ...



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