Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

10

Three ideas (one you might not like, but if it works...): Make sure he goes to the bathroom just before bed. Did wonders for our daughter. Try some higher-absorbency pullups. Since he's almost 6, maybe move to GoodNights or something similar for older kids with bladder control issues. You might just be overloading the capacity of the diaper. If you can ...


5

Frankly you will be told by any professional that you should not. This is what we were told with our first 3. Over the years what we have learnt is this: limit the consumption of liquids, especially water at 6pm. By 7pm and before bed, he should be taken for a pee - this should be a ritual from now on. Thus you would have to build a motivational ...


2

To @Valkyrie's excellent suggestions, I would add that mastering toileting is your child's "job," and at this age you might consider making him part of the clean-up process. If the sheets are wet in the morning, he has to help pull them, he helps wash them, he helps put them back on the bed. By making him responsible for these daytime activities, he may ...


2

My boy was waking up wet a lot older than is typical, and here is what we did. We happened to have some plastic graduated beakers that held about 800 ml and were clearly marked to measure volume. I showed him how to read the volume on them and we kept them in the bathroom. I encouraged him during the day, when he was home and could go to the bathroom ...


2

Only anecdotal, but a counter-argument to those who say that by waking him you are encouraging him to be dependent on you to stay dry - we used to take my son to the toilet in the night until he was about 7 and stopped needing it of his own accord. The hormonal changes required to slow down urine production at night don't kick in very early in some children, ...


2

My younger son struggled with night-time wetting until he was 14. In his younger years, we weren't too worried about it; I had several friends who assured me he would grow out of it. He was a VERY heavy sleeper, and even if I went in to wake him for a bathroom break in the middle of the night, he didn't really wake up. I actually stopped doing that after I ...


1

At the request of the OP I have added this as an answer and deleted the comment. I would like offer an alternative to the maxi pad suggestion: try wool long underwear. I have a heavy wetter (not toilet trained yet, but still...) and I had the same laundry issue as you. And it isn't easy changing crib sheets either, so I feel your pain. Anyway, you can find ...


1

When our toddler was going through a bedwetting phase, we just started waking her up when we went to bed later, and taking her to the loo. Actually, waking up is too strong a word, as she was normally still half asleep. It stopped her wetting the bed, and a couple of weeks later we stopped waking her up. If the bed wetting started again, we would start ...


1

If your child is often wetting the bed at night, he is likely not ready to be sleeping without a diaper or pull-ups. From PubMed Health (US National Library of Medicine): Nighttime bladder and bowel control develops somewhat more slowly. So, even once your child is dry during the daytime, it can take a while before they notice in their sleep that ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible