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Bed wetting, even at 7 years old, is common. About 1 in 40 children at that age wet the bed. Children usually grow out of it. Stop waking her in the night. That doesn't help. Make sure she is drinking plenty in the day time. This will help her train her bladder. She should reduce the amount she drinks in the evenings. Make going to the loo last thing ...


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Well, urine has 2 characteristics to consider: Presence of bacteria Acidity For a long time the concept of urine being sterile in non-sick individuals has been well-known. Recent research indicates that that may not be the case. However, if you're sick, you won't make yourself more sick by being exposed to yourself. So, if things are cleaned up in a ...


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My younger son struggled with night-time wetting until he was 14. In his younger years, we weren't too worried about it; I had several friends who assured me he would grow out of it. He was a VERY heavy sleeper, and even if I went in to wake him for a bathroom break in the middle of the night, he didn't really wake up. I actually stopped doing that after I ...


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This is very common. Make sure drinks are done an hour before bedtime and the toilet gets used every night, last thing. Get a waterproof mattress pad and extra sheets, and change them when you need to. It's important that you don't dump a bucket of shame on the kid. She's not doing it on purpose. Try to laugh. This to shall pass.


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My wife is the school nurse at an outdoor school (sixth grade camp) and this problem is very common among the sixth graders (10-11 year olds) she sees. They've developed procedures so these kids can attend successfully without the other kids knowing. As annoying as this is, it will pass. Adding shame, even unintentionally, will help nothing and hurt a lot. ...


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At the request of the OP I have added this as an answer and deleted the comment. I would like offer an alternative to the maxi pad suggestion: try wool long underwear. I have a heavy wetter (not toilet trained yet, but still...) and I had the same laundry issue as you. And it isn't easy changing crib sheets either, so I feel your pain. Anyway, you can find ...


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In addition to the physiological maturity as Danny suggests, it's possible that something's changed in his body: anything from an illness causing him to retain water slightly differently to a growth spurt. He might even just be a bit thirstier close to bedtime than usual. It's also possible that he's a bit stressed out from something, or wants more ...


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While this may seem stressful and worrying to you, your son will grow out of it. Waking him to go potty is a good idea, but you can't determine when/how often he'll need to. Some children are just heavy sleepers and don't wake from the urge to go to the bathroom. My daughter had the same issue (my son did not). We looked into bed wetting alarm systems etc., ...


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From the same article posted in the question, the symptoms section identifies when to consult a doctor: When to see a doctor Most children outgrow bed-wetting on their own — but some need a little help. In other cases, bed-wetting may be a sign of an underlying condition that needs medical attention. Consult your child's doctor if: Your ...



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