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6

Bed wetting, even at 7 years old, is common. About 1 in 40 children at that age wet the bed. Children usually grow out of it. Stop waking her in the night. That doesn't help. Make sure she is drinking plenty in the day time. This will help her train her bladder. She should reduce the amount she drinks in the evenings. Make going to the loo last thing ...


5

My wife is the school nurse at an outdoor school (sixth grade camp) and this problem is very common among the sixth graders (10-11 year olds) she sees. They've developed procedures so these kids can attend successfully without the other kids knowing. As annoying as this is, it will pass. Adding shame, even unintentionally, will help nothing and hurt a lot. ...


3

We had a similar situation. We survived. Most nights are dry now. Let me get the bad news out first: There are a few children that will be bedwetting until their teens. A few. Very, very few. We had a similar problem and worked closely with our trusted pediatrician. There is one thing to kerp in mind: Dry nights are a combination of reduced urine ...


3

If there's no medical reason for the bed wetting I would persist with an alarm style system to wake the child up when they begin to wet the bed. I had the same problem for many years (into my early teens) and went to the doctors frequently but no issues were found, I tried several medicines to no effect. My parents tried most of the tactics regarding ...


2

My son was a bed wetter until he was 8 and his father and I split. I mean it stopped as soon as he left. Maybe stress?


1

My 3yr old also gets restless and cries in her sleep. If she needs to go pee, it's hard to wake her. I use to get mad, but I realize she's not doing this on a purpose or to be lazy. She wakes up and tells me "I'm sorry, Mommy, I'm wet!" So now I just say, "It's OK. Next time try and wake up to pee," and I send her to change herself with a little help of ...


1

It really should pass, however I know that the addition of shame can prolong and even make the issue worse. Waking her up with break up her sleep and make her more tired. My experience is that bedwetting is best solved with rewards and celebration of success. Ultimately if it continues to 10+years old there may be trauma that is contributing to the ...


1

If there's no medical reason for the bed wetting I would suggest an alarm style system to wake the child up when they begin to wet the bed. I had the same problem for many years (into my early teens) and went to the doctors frequently but no issues were found, I tried several medicines to no effect. My parents tried most of the tactics you've tried and from ...


1

In addition to the physiological maturity as Danny suggests, it's possible that something's changed in his body: anything from an illness causing him to retain water slightly differently to a growth spurt. He might even just be a bit thirstier close to bedtime than usual. It's also possible that he's a bit stressed out from something, or wants more ...


1

While this may seem stressful and worrying to you, your son will grow out of it. Waking him to go potty is a good idea, but you can't determine when/how often he'll need to. Some children are just heavy sleepers and don't wake from the urge to go to the bathroom. My daughter had the same issue (my son did not). We looked into bed wetting alarm systems etc., ...



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