Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

16

We had exactly the same situation with our daughter, until very recently (she is three years old now). The best recommendation I can give you is: Patience.. Patience.. Patience... We were always firm about washing her hair regularly, even though she protested quite strongly. On the other hand, we always told her before, that we would wash her hair today ...


13

American Pediatrics Society recommends around the age of 6 before they are allowed to bathe alone; however, a quick google search will tell you that many parents start around the age of 4. However, usually parents who leave their kids alone make sure that they have no music on, and can hear the child clearly wherever they are. They also check in on the child ...


12

Can this be baby acne? If it is, it has nothing to do with the number of times you bathe your child. The rule of thumb torbengb mentions, to wash it once a week, is ok, altough I would bathe it more than that, but that's probably more because of social pressure and not for health reasons. We washed our baby regularly with a washcloth with lukewarm water ...


11

The reason behind the "keep water out of the ear" thing stems from the fact that an infant's ear canal is angled differently than an adult's (or even an older child's). In an infant, the angle is such that it is more prone to collecting water, which can then sit, stagnate, and eventually lead to ear infections. Some children are so prone to ear infections ...


11

We not only used to bathe the kids in such a way that their ears were definitely under water when rinsing their hair, but took them swimming from a couple of months old. If the water is from a source which could contain infection - eg the sea, or a public swimming pool - you just give the ears a good rinse when they get out and then dry. When children are ...


11

With my 22-month-old son, the complete opposite approach works best. If I take water in a pitcher and shout: "Wooooo SPLASH!" as I let it all fall on his head, he laughs and asks for more. If I try to do it slowly and patiently, he complains. In general, I find that adding sound effects to the activities he dislikes helps a lot (such as going "bzzzz CLIP! ...


11

Something happened. What, nobody knows except him. Probably he is now reminded of this when you give him a bath, and he starts screaming. If you now force him to have a bath even though he is screaming, this will just keep on making it worse. For every bath you give him while he is screaming, the association between horror and bathing will be stronger. ...


11

As you mentioned, it is the temperature change. What may work for you is this: Immediately prior to the bath, get a warm washcloth. Open his diaper, and clean his diaper area with the washcloth. Be careful with this! If it works, he may start to urinate while you are cleaning him, so you must be ready to quickly put the diaper back into place! ...


9

Is it drying by towel? As a kid I hated having someone else wiping my face clean, it felt so invasive, demeaning and uncomfortable (and to be honest I think I just got used to fighting it). The washing... I don't know. Maybe give him the option to do it himself? The towel might be a bit too vigorous for his taste (not an accusation! I'm sure you're ...


8

It's about choice. It's not that he doesn't want a bath, it's that he wants to say when he has a bath. That's not possible of course, but one way that seems to work with my 3 year old is to ask "do you want your bath before x, or after x", that way he has some choice. I'm amazed how well this tends to work. What you have to remember is that children are as ...


7

Turmeric is a common ingredient in ayurvedic medicine, taken both internally and externally. In a bath or used in massage, it is said to help with skin conditions (including diaper rash), pigment issues, and excess hair. It is considered by some as a gentler alternative to soap for sensitive skin, though some types of turmeric are considered too harsh for a ...


7

You should check for feces between the labia and wipe any globules away as needed. Infections can and will arise if stuff is allowed to sit there. You can gently spread the labia to get a good look and make sure there isn't anything "hiding" in a fold. Soaps and other kinds of cleansers can also create problems so use a moistened cotton ball or swab ...


6

Don't bathe small children too often, especially not daily! There's a risk they develop a skin condition like dermatitis. In Austria, the recommendation from the midwives' association is to bathe infants weekly *' and newborns and infants ordinarily don't get so dirty that you need to use soaps (and lotions afterward) -- just let the baby's skin do what ...


5

If I was warm and happy in the tub I would probably scream too when you took me out ;) It's probably a combination of being somewhere that is warm and feels natural (think that they spent 9 months floating in warm body temperature water) and just simple opposition to any kind of transition. I think that kids of all ages (even some of us old guys) need a ...


5

We ramped it up. As an infant with sensitive skin, we bathed her about every 4-6 days or on an 'as needed' basis for those unusual incidents which require a little extra soap! We found that this was sufficient for general cleanliness. As she got older and more active we very slowly increased the frequency of baths. At 2 years of age now, we bathe her about ...


5

I had a similar concern when I started giving my baby stackable cups in the bath, and he would drink cup after cup of water for fun :) Babycenter claims that this is normal and nothing to worry about. Altmann recommends discouraging this behavior, but says you don't need to be too concerned about it. What to Expect makes a similar claim - although ...


5

When my son was 2-4 years old, we had this issue and used a large plastic storage box (without the lid!) for this, and it worked very well. They're cheap (and since we had just moved had many anyway, and when he didn't need it any more, it went back into service as a box), have no sharp edges, and completely watertight. Ensure that it's the high quality ...


4

I say you don't need special baby products for this. We bathed our infant in the sink, and once he outgrew that we moved to the tub with a hand's width of water. Still works well at 18 months! We are ALWAYS next to the tub; our child is never unsupervised near water. It's also a lot of fun to watch, and after playing for a while, it's soap time and then ...


4

We picked up a tub at BabySam here in DK for our son - he's 3 and he still fits in it perfectly: Volume: 90 liter. Dimensions H33, B69 og L82 cm. They also have a new sort of bathtub, one that's foldable: Its dimensions: Unfolded: L:67 cm, B:39 cm, H:24 cm Folded : L:67 cm, B:8 cm, H:24 cm Weight: 1,3 kg. We just have the tub on its side against ...


4

The recommendation I got from the midwives in 2009 was that the water needs to be body-temperature. Use a bath thermometer to check this, because it should never be warmer than that. This applies to infants in particular. This becomes less of an issue as the child grows, but you should certainly be careful in the first year. Yes, this means that if you ...


3

I have dealt with this fear as a babysitter and this always works. Kids never cry when I wash their hair. First get or make some bath puppets. Puppets make a great distraction and kids would rather have the puppets washing a rinsing their hair. Buy a unbreakable mirror. At lunch or anytime way before bathtime show your son the puppets have them talk to him ...


3

I struggled at bath time with my children (now 2, 3, and 4) when they were very little. I found two things to be helpful. First, before the bath, I would turn the shower head on full hot, full blast for a minute or two with the door closed to fill the room with steam. That raised the temperature of the bathroom enough for a naked infant to be comfortable ...


3

What's worked well for us is to put our child into the bath while it's still empty, and let the water run for a minute or so. This way they'll feel the water, and if they need to go, it'll be while the plug is still out. Then you can rinse out the tub and start the bath without worrying about it.


3

Treb makes some wonderful points that I hope you find reassuring. In addition to these, we had the same problem with our little one for awhile too. The way we solved it was by giving her a choice to let us do it or she could do it while we monitored and made sure all of it got rinsed. She learned how to lean back somewhat and use the a cup while she sat ...


3

8 1/2 months is close to one of the "wonder weeks", so it's not unlikely that something changed mentally. It's possible the sensory feeling of the water is a problem for him; while my older son never hated baths, he was always the kid at daycare that hated playing with mud/snow/yogurt/jello with his hands, and never finger painted - he just didn't like the ...


3

You only need to bath your baby 2-3 times a week. You can choose to bath your baby everyday if she enjoys bath time or if it helps as part of her bed time routine. You do however need to make sure your babies face, neck, hands and bottom are cleaned everyday. This is known as top and tailing.


3

How old is your child? Is she able to sit up herself yet? When we started immersing our young infant for a bath, we used the First Years Infant to Toddler Tub with sling (first photo, on the left). In the end, we didn't use the sling much since though it provided some support, I thought it got in the way of us cleaning the baby. The seat provided me some ...


3

My children pee in the bathtub every time they get in. Urine is sterile enough that it won't cause any problems...unless there is a urinary tract infection, it's nothing to worry about. I usually just throw a washcloth over the genitals (if it's a boy - so far I have had two boys) so that they don't end up spraying themselves in the face, because that is ...


3

Our two-year-old has been the same way for the last year and a half. :-/ She likes splashing in the tub and washing the rest of herself, but really, really does not like having her hair washed (drying used to be almost as bad, but has gotten better since we started patting it gently instead of doing it the quicker normal/adult way). I wish I had an answer ...


3

Our daughter initially didn't like getting her hair washed. It is rather invasive, like Michael said, but washing your hair is just a necessity of social standards. What I started to do was warn her. I'd let her know beforehand "I'm going to wash your head soon". At the same time I'd show her the shampoo and prep a wet washcloth just in case soap got into ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible