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Baby led weaning is based on the premise that the baby can identify food before tasting it, so obviously you should avoid nondescript mush. With our son, we really didn't encounter significant problems; we mostly offered him the same food we had. We were given the advice not to offer any spicy food, but once he got hold of some spicy stuff on our plate, he ...


5

That sounds like my one year old. He has a few teeth - 4 of them - but really doesn't make much use of them; incisors aren't that helpful at proper chewing (and he only got the bottom two a month or two ago). He's been shoving food into his face since he was 4 months old, never liked purees. Definitely have had a bunch of choking incidents, although all ...


4

I'll start by saying that this is the first time I've heard of the name "Rapley method," but I did a sort of middle ground between that and spoon feeding (basically, I fed my son mashed food, but was simply his hands until he could do it himself, how much he ate was dictated by him, and the process as a whole was baby-led). Here are some of the ...


3

I'm not an expert (we did BLW but not in a terribly organized manner), but I would tend to say, not very much. Baby-led weaning, from what I know, is mostly about teaching the baby to learn how to eat; and while feeders are nice to use for teething (which is what we used them for), they don't really teach the baby how to eat very well. To the extent that ...


3

The esophagus of a child is about the diameter of a hot dog or a grape. So, as a guide, make the pieces smaller than that. We quartered our hot dogs. Choking is a problem if children stuff their mouths with food and if they are moving around with food in their mouths. We were late starting the rule not to leave the table until your mouth is empty, having ...


3

I am not sure about toast - we give our 10 month old slightly toasted bread with plenty of butter to keep it soft. It's soft enough that can rip it apart with her little fingers. We usually take the crust off because that requires a lot more effort for her to chew. As for other foods, all the veggies and fruits we give her are steamed enough to be fairly ...


2

We've always made the food small, depending on age and size we've expanded the food from about the size of a pinky (small finger) nail up to "kid bite-size". It also depends on if the child knows how to chew, or can break up the food in their mouth. Toast was good for us since it was grippable, and the toast begins to break up in the mouth, fries and ...


2

I think Joe has answered the bulk or your question so I won't repeat his answers, but I think it's worth mentioning that choking can happen irrelevant of your chosen weaning method. So even if you decided to revert to spoon feeding pureƩ you're not going to completely cut out any risk. If baby is unbothered by what happened, you just have to get on with it. ...


1

I always considered a spoon to be the only "food feeder" a baby needs. Why have her learn to use a mesh bag unless that's what she'll use as a grown up? It doesn't make any sense to teach her to use one gadget (which is gross and really hard to clean, BTW) only to have to teach her to use another later. I think the most effective "food feeders" for babies ...


1

We started our little one with baby-lead weaning when she was about 6 months old. We gave her soft fruit (kiwi, mango, watermelon) cut into pieces she could hold in her hand. Sometimes the mango had skin on it, sometimes it didn't. She had the kinds of problems you'd expect, some gagging, choking a couple of times, but she just loved eating proper food, so ...


1

I found this site very helpful in matching a child's motor skills to their readiness for various food consistencies. http://www.babycenter.com/0_age-by-age-guide-to-feeding-your-baby_1400680.bc



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