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8

You may have heard the expression "if you've seen one child with autism, you've seen ONE child with autism". "autism" covers such a wide range of behaviors and experiences that it's really hard to make general predictions. Furthermore, age is a big factor here with all children (and cats, for that matter), autistic or not. That said, Dalton's reasoning makes ...


7

Both my daughter (16) and son (13) are high-level autistic (would have been called aspie by the old yardstick). We've had cats their entire lives. Currently we have two cats, a big black labrador, and two guinea pigs. In the past we've also had goldfish and hermit crabs. They've been very good with the pets overall. The cats certainly make a lot more sense ...


7

What percentage of diagnosis fall into each category? Is Aspergers, PDD-NOS or Classic Autism the most common? It's not an easy question to answer. Paper after paper disputes the validity of the manner of distinction of the subtypes, and differences between the DSM-IV and the DSM-V are significant, resulting in a reclassification of a large number of ...


5

She can discern that she's different from other kids her age. She's expressing this in a way that's heartbreaking for me to even read, let alone to deal with as a parent. As hard as it is, the time has come to validate her suspicions. If she didn't need some sort of validation, she wouldn't be asking you. At the risk of sounding chiché-ish, it's time for her ...


5

Talk to the school. They should have an anti-bullying policy. Get it and insist that they apply it in this case. Write to the teachers. Identify the specific hurtful behaviours being used and insist that they are stamped on. The only way to stop this is to make it clear to the bullies that their behaviour will not be tolerated. Bullying is child abuse, no ...


5

I hate to break it to you, but you're probably going to have to figure it out on your own, or with the help of an occupational therapist. My daughter has cerebral palsy and often gets loud and bothersome as you describe, but the things we have learned that calm her don't work at all for my nephews with down syndrome or autism, or even other children with ...


4

I'm 17 years old, and it was about 4 years ago when I developed this problem. I laugh for just about everything. I laugh when I'm happy, when I think of something funny, when I'm nervous, embarrassed, and when I'm getting yelled at! I hate that I laugh when my parents are yelling at me, I really do! I know that it only further pisses my parents off ...


4

I don't have any experience with potty training a special needs child, but I have potty trained three boys, and even though they are normal (developmentally anyway) it was very frustrating at times, and we had our brushes with total madness as well. So, in that respect, it appears potty training is progressing normally for you. Hang in there, your child ...


3

You're not losing your "one remaining brain cell". You are absolutely right in wanting the child tested for anything and everything, and with the signs you discuss, I have no idea why your requests aren't being carried out. Regardless of what exactly is going on with your child, a parent's feeling that something is not right is one of the most reliable ...


3

I'm autistic and I do this too. It's not defiance or satisfaction at provoking the person or anything like that. It's completely involuntary and not associated with happiness at all. My impression is that many autistic people express emotions using different kinds of nonverbal signals than non-autistic people. For example, I once met a kid who showed ...


3

My daughter seems to like shoving her hand down her diapers. She is a scratch fan so she just tears up her skin unless we block her with a onesie. They make them for larger kids too: www.special-need-products.com They look like normal shirts so he shouldn't appear strangely to anyone. Just that when he does decide to give the toilet a try he will need extra ...


2

We have a child who is mildly Asperger's, and our story mirrors yours in many ways. He was six before he was dry through the night. We tried many things over a few years, but victory came with a concerted effort, following a plan from a physiotherapist who specialises in this. The plan is: use a bed wetting alarm (ours is similar to this). The child ...


2

Our almost-four year old still hits and bites some, particularly when frustrated, so I can sympathize. We have made some strides with him, though, which show us that it is possible to overcome it. Our son hits basically for one reason: lack of ability to deal with frustration, particularly frustration over a lack of control. So, we focus on two things: ...


1

Like some people say, take him to a shelter and see how he reacts with animals...In addition to that, I will give an advice: if you decide to get a cat, choose a older one. Why? Older cats (more than 1 yo) have their character defined, if they say: "he/she is very kind", it's 99.9% true. A kitty...yeah, they're stinking cute, but also a time bomb: you don't ...


1

There's already been a number of excellent resources mentioned. To add to that, you may check out the parent support resources from the Asperger/Autism Network or Wrongplanet.net.


1

When we were heading towards a diagnosis for our eldest son (in the UK as well) one of the things we did was to go private for an audiology test so we could rule that out. We needed this step fast to get the autism statement moving before school started so we could get special needs assistance in place. Of course we were lucky to be in a position to afford ...


1

Allergies are a possibility As the parent of an ASD kid, you might need to factor in allergies. Our intelligent, verbal ASD son had a problem for years until he was diagnosed with a milk and soya allergy. Once we took him off the milk, toileting immediately became much more predictable and he gained much more control. Prior to this he appeared to have ...



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