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24

From what you're writing, you don't really want him to get any hobby, but a hobby where he can socialize. If he's slightly autistic, socializing is the hardest thing for him to do. And it will be even harder if the socializing is in a context where he has nothing to talk about or isn't interested in the things people talk about. You said he likes to use ...


24

A hobby is something you like. How do you force someone to like something? Additionally, at the choice of hobbies there is an extra agenda: You want him to socialize. I think you have a good point. The time he has now, as a kid, will not come back. Social skills he could be picking up now, will be harder to learn when he realises he's missing something. ...


15

I am not so sure this is an answer, and I am not a medical practitioner, but you are drawing conclusions based on tiny bits of information, much of which is conflicting. Sometimes your daughter displays behaviors that are possibly indicative of a behavioral condition, and sometimes she behaves in ways that are absolutely "normal." The only real issues you ...


11

I was just extremely socially awkward as a kid, not autistic, but here's what I would suggest: In Scouts (talk with the Scoutmaster and try to figure out what would be best), there are many different routes for him to take. I had my own tent that I would bring on all outings so I didn't have to share, and knot-tying was the hobby I worked on there. By ...


9

Even with neurotypical kids, it can be challenging to find a hobby or sport that they like well enough to stick with and really develop. Some kids find their niche right away, others have to try lots of different things to figure out what works for them and what doesn't. I think you have two choices: build off of the hobbies he does have or try to help him ...


7

I think you're saying something different than you really mean. You say "he needs a hobby" but what you mean is "he needs a different hobby". There are plenty of people without mental health issues who love nothing more than to spend their time on a computer, and plenty of people who do. It isn't a "problem" - instead, it's just another avenue that has its ...


6

What percentage of diagnosis fall into each category? Is Aspergers, PDD-NOS or Classic Autism the most common? It's not an easy question to answer. Paper after paper disputes the validity of the manner of distinction of the subtypes, and differences between the DSM-IV and the DSM-V are significant, resulting in a reclassification of a large number of ...


6

Just a short answer to make an additional suggestion to the ones already given, which I'm kind of surprised hasn't come up already: board, dice, card or other tabletop games. Games of this kind often go down well with people on the Autism spectrum because they offer an activity with clearly-defined, easily understood boundaries. And it's obviously a pretty ...


4

If he is only slightly autistic, then it is a good idea to try to find a hobby for him and even push him a little (not forcefully, more like guidance and example). After all everyone needs some free time to relax, not only to idle, but the brain actually demands it. With autism sometimes there is a lack of understanding for the needs of others and even ...


3

I have Asperger's syndrome and I have known quite a few others who also has Asperger's syndrome. I'll share with you what I know about hobbies and social life for me and those others. Keep in mind, this is me sharing my own experiences and my own perspective on things. You can pick what you think applies and forget about the rest. I can't guarantee that any ...


3

It may be bit late but I don't think anyone else has covered what I wanted to say. I have a similar problem to your daughter; when I am nervous or anxious I sometimes get a nearly irresistible urge to smile or even laugh. Of course I do try to stop myself, and can most of the time now I am an adult, but not always. I have never really understood why it ...


3

Correlation, not causation, is the problem here. Nothing "causes" autism, it is a natural state for people. It's not even an "illness", it's a combination of personality and behavioral states that we classify as a condition simply because it is outside of "social norms". In short: "it just happens" The parents have heard that vaccination causes Autism, so ...


2

We are in a similar situation, except that we haven't talked with a pediatrician yet. My related question (At which age does it make sense to see a professional when suspecting Asperger?) was inspired by fear of exactly what has happened to you. From what I have read so far, it is common that Aspergers symptoms are not always present, i.e., the child ...


2

This is not a direct answer to your question but a suggestion on how to gather more data. If you don't know any of the other kinder parents, enlist the teacher's help in identifying sympathetic parents. Approach them and ask for a playdate (one at a time). Discuss with them the issue and that you want to see if your daughter is just overwhelmed by the ...


2

I'm not a parent (also, I'm only 21). However, I was always pretty shy outside of the home when I was a kid. What I enjoyed the most was being on the computer (even at the age of 10), and learning how to program, how to design, etc. Too many people see computers as just something that's a waste of time for kids, but I'm now a (successful) front-end developer ...


2

As other answers have suggested playing on the computer can be a hobby. However, you want him to be able interact socially. The good news is that there are a lot of social interactions to be formed online, and they can be lower pressure than being face to face. Now, you do need to worry about safety, especially since some people in the autism spectrum can ...


2

Speaking from experience, IT is pretty much an ideal hobby for someone with ASD. It will stand him in very good stead later in life, and may spark his interest in other topics such as maths, neuroscience, robotics, physics, etc. As an ASD person he's probably only going to enjoy socialising with people with shared interests, people he can have interesting ...


2

You're not losing your "one remaining brain cell". You are absolutely right in wanting the child tested for anything and everything, and with the signs you discuss, I have no idea why your requests aren't being carried out. Regardless of what exactly is going on with your child, a parent's feeling that something is not right is one of the most reliable ...


2

Causes of autism spectrum disorder The exact causes of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are unknown, although it is thought that several complex genetic and environmental factors are involved. The causes of ASD can be described in two ways: Primary ASD (also known as idiopathic ASD) – where no underlying factors can be identified to ...


1

When we were heading towards a diagnosis for our eldest son (in the UK as well) one of the things we did was to go private for an audiology test so we could rule that out. We needed this step fast to get the autism statement moving before school started so we could get special needs assistance in place. Of course we were lucky to be in a position to afford ...


1

Update about the laughter, after some Google magic: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nervous_laughter Disclaimer: I'm Autistic and this is from personal experience. When I'm in a stressful situation or when I get nervous, my face will get extremely red and I will often start to laugh uncontrollably; it has costed me many friendships and it caused even more ...


1

I, too, am struggling with the uncontrolled laughter of my 22 year old son with ASD. He has always laughed occasionally at inappropriate times, but now he is older, more is expected of him, and it is very disruptive at school and at home. He, too, laughs when I get angry at him--I do believe that anger is a frightening emotion for people on the spectrum ...


1

I'm a parent of a 5 year old and I was diagnosed being on the scale some time ago. Let me recommend two things that I would have found helpful as a kid and we're finding works well for my son (also on the scale). First and foremost - do not attempt to force certain hobbies on your kid. It doesn't work and won't be a hobby. Lord knows I went through ...


1

I have a nephew with two great parents, and they enrolled him on a horse riding course especially for children with autism. The kids benefit greatly from this and my nephew absolutely loved it. You'll know yourself if this is a viable hobby for your son, or if he might enjoy horseriding without the therapeutic setting. Involve your son in the decision. ...


1

Far be it from me to classify your son but perhaps he does not like being too social, being bored easily and slightly Autistic it sounds like he could be very intelligent. So here are some ideas : Outdoor: Buy a 'flexifoil' power kite, fun, solo activity, good for fitness and strength, hours spent out in the sun and wind. At the same time he's learning ...


1

Contrary to all the other answers, you most certainly should force your son into additional activities if your son won't take the initiative to become a well rounded person on their own. Times are different from just a few years ago. Video games of today are awesome and time consuming. 12 hours each day can fly by in the wink of an eye while playing them. I ...


1

My brother was in the same position as your son, and my parents found a great activity that he really enjoyed: he began music therapy. Basically he would go and play an instrument with the instructor (he chose bass, but it could be anything) and they played together, any songs he wanted, just for half an hour a week. My parents too had to force him to get ...


1

Sounds to me like he wants more independence and less parental oversight. He ought to figure out for himself what he wants to do, probably something that will allow him to support himself as soon as he's old enough. Don't knock what he chooses to do unless it hurts other people or his health. Your love and care and concern could be suppressing him and making ...



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