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8

We did buy special soap for our first child (it is very expensive) but by the time the third and fourth came around we didn't have time to wash their clothes separately and we found it completely unnecessary. I would use regular soap (without perfumes) and see what happens. If your child seems to be having a reaction (rash) then speak to the Doctor about ...


7

Check with a pediatrician. Conjunctivitis (commonly known as pink eye) doesn't always show a pink color on the eyes, and the crusting is often associated. You shouldn't be making diagnosises at home or off the internet. Let the doctor decide. Some things you can put off bringing to a doctor (minor colds, etc), but possible eye infections are not ...


6

Both of my kids have some form of lactose intolerance. Whenever they have milk, they develop a mild rash. Take the milk away for a few days and the rash goes away. We've switched to soy- and rice-based alternatives for now, and try to give the children some milk once every few months to see if it helps. Our oldest, who is five, now shows less signs of ...


6

I don't know of anything "official", but I'm not sure "official" would be better. Kids are different from one another, and no average or generality is helpful in predicting what will work best for any individual. I've found that kids are pretty good at signaling those transitions. I could definitely tell when breast milk alone wasn't enough for my son, ...


5

What is "official" changes from one country to the next. The World Health Organisation (WHO) recommends exclusive brestfeeding until at least 6 months (and continuing as a complement until 2 years!). It is commonly advised to start with some fruits or vegetables around 4 months, but more as an opportunity for discovering different tastes and textures: don't ...


4

This site says no dairy or citrus till age one, no wheat or egg whites till two. And no peanut butter, fish, or shellfish till age three, because of allergies. It recommends against any whole nuts till age four. http://www.keepkidshealthy.com/infant/startingsolids.html That's fine advice, but we read similar recommendations, and then once our kids were ...


4

Here in Southern California, we have "Santa Ana Winds" a few times a year. When the Santa Anas come, or in hay fever season, or during other allergy times, my daughter would get crusty eyes. When the allergies abated, so did the crusty eyes. Yes, be aware, but it doesn't yet need to rise to concern. If she has a cold or allergies are acting up, this is most ...


3

It wouldn't be a bad idea to ask your pediatrician. There are general guidelines, like start with rice cereal around 5 or 6 months, then move to whole grains, then pureed fruits and veggies. Those are good, but other, kid-specific factors (weight, history, nursing vs bottle-fed) may be relevant. And you should also get a list of foods to NOT eat before a ...


3

I've found that the WHO's recommendations seem geared toward developing countries with poor sanitation, nutrition, and education. If that doesn't apply to you, they can be rather draconian. Every time I hear some recommendation about solids, I hear about another new study that debunks the old one. Exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months used to be the ...


3

It would probably be worth your time to take your child to an allergist to determine what in particular he is reacting to. A HEPA filter would only help if the allergen is both airborne and small enough to penetrate your regular filter. Sources of allergic reaction can be airborne, food borne, or come in direct contact with the skin. The best way to ...


3

Looking at peanut butter... remembering baby poop... not seeing much difference... could you be more specific in what you notice? I've never tried the "Earth's Best" brand, but carrots often cause constipation or other troubles when introduced as a first food. My advice is to wait on carrots until your son has been accustomed to gentler foods (fruits, baby ...


2

A cool mist humidifier was very helpful for our son as well as sleeping in a non or minimally heated bedroom. Heat dries the air which dries the mucosal membranes of the nasal and sinus cavities which is the bodies air filtration system. If the mucosa is dry then it is unable to trap the airborne pathogens before they enter the lungs. The humidifier added ...


2

I wouldn't recommend testing an allergen on your child by yourself - that's something which should occur at your dr's office. That way, if there's a severe reaction (anaphylaxis) you and your child will be in good hands. You say you're allergic to natural SLS (which is derived from coconut and/or palm kernel oil) - you might do well to see if you also have ...


2

I am not a doctor, but I believe so. I would call your pediatrician and do some google-ing in the meantime. And, keep your baby away from peanuts for now. I know people have varying degrees of sensitivities and I've known friends that can have a reaction from contact with someone else that had contact with whatever they are allergic to. I don't see why ...


2

Surprisingly, not that much is known about food allergies. My son has been part of the HealthNuts study for the past 3 years where they track 5300 kids with allergies. In those three years, they have reversed some of the previous recommendations. A recent NY Times article discusses some on the latest research into the effect the mothers immune systems has on ...


2

If by "local rash" you mean a red patch on the chin or something, odds are very high it's got nothing to do with the foods you are feeding him, particularly if it's something like rice that virtually nobody is allergic to. Most babies start drooling at the same age as they start eating solids (in fact, it's considered a sign of readiness), and most often ...


1

As long as you can not see any obvious health issues (coughing, scratching, pain or worse) it is unlikely to be an allergy. If you want to be absolutely sure, you need to see a doctor, however I doubt your little one will love to get about 20-30 needles into his arms for the test. Alternatively you can try small doses of what you think might cause an ...


1

This goes without saying, but for 1), talk to your pediatrician right away - don't wait for the next regular appointment. Take a food log, take pictures, keep notes on times, and then go in and show them what you have. Your pediatrician should be experienced at dealing with food allergies and be able to tell you if this is something to be concerned about ...


1

While life would be easier if you could always connect A to B, things usually aren't that simple. It's quite possible that the "bunch of red bumps" you describe were a) there already but you didn't notice, b) related to something entirely different, or c) essentially random (which describes most baby acne). If you want to make sure, I'd just dab some ...


1

My daughter used to have a reaction when we used normal detergents. When we started washing her clothes in "Lux Pure Soap Flakes" the problem went away. Eventually we were able to move her to Amolin detergent which means that we could use our washing machine for her stuff and did not have to wash her's separately to ours.


1

Here is a good link that talks about the symptoms and various causes of pink eye and the associated eye crusties. Really, pink eye can be a symptom of many, many eye issues. It can be caused by abrasions of the eye, infections, and allergies...not all of which require immediate medical intervention. Bacterial conjunctivitis must absolutely be treated with ...


1

Both of our children have sensitive skin (to the point that it seems like looking at their skin cross-eyed causes a breakout, and they would have rashes anywhere the clothing would touch) and we switched our whole family to Charlie's Laundry Soap (you can get it on Amazon for approximately the same cost as other detergents) on our pediatrician's ...


1

I'm from the US, so I'm not familiar with the brands available where you live. Here, though, the most popular "baby detergent" is Dreft. If you compare the ingredients in Dreft with most other laundry detergents, you don't find much of a difference. I have the feeling that the same thing would be true of baby detergents in the UK. I agree with @morah; ...


1

It's important to distinguish lactose intolerance from dairy allergy. Lactose intolerance occurs when the body loses the ability to digest lactose. Someone with lactose intolerance can consume lactose-free dairy products (including hard cheeses) without trouble; lactose-containing dairy products will cause gastrointestinal upset, but no other problems. On ...


1

Same here, except we are dealing with milk protein which means not even lactose free milk. My 2-year-old gets a rash on her tummy and a runny nose which then means an ear infection. No milk, cheese, yogurt, etc. means no ear infections. Also, soy is also a very very common allergy so while you are trying to decide, I'd avoid soy products as well. One more ...


1

I've had kids with lactose intolerance too. It is more common then most people realize, and can show up in a variety of ways (not just rashes and ear infections, although those are the most common). Two ways: Eliminate dairy completely for a short amount of time - it is possible to do. Take them to an allergist and have them tested. We eliminated all ...


1

Here's a PDF from the British Dietetic Association (Paediatric Group) http://www.bda.uk.com/publications/statements/PositionStatementWeaning.pdf Here's a quote from them: • Exclusive breastfeeding from birth until weaning is the optimal way to feed young infants. • Continuing breastfeeding throughout weaning may reduce the risk of coeliac ...


1

The UK National Health Service has something called "From Birth to 5" (also called 'the green book') which is available to all parents. This covers a wide range of evidence-based advice. http://www.nhs.uk/Planners/birthtofive/Pages/Vitamins.aspx Growing children, especially those not eating a varied diet, sometimes don't get enough vitamin A and C. ...


1

Soft food like strawberries and bananas can be eaten from the age of around 4 months old. White grapes without the skin are great too. Start with (very) little bites and bits per day. Some crouton staves (white bread) with no herbs are great to start out with too. Light bread can be sucked on too. Plain potatoes and thoroughly boiled vegetables can be eaten ...



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