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You might think about writing a story with your child. Make it something fun and whimsical, involving household pets or people that you know. My daughter loves writing stories about our pets driving taxis; our German Shepherd owns the taxi service and she only has cats to drive the taxis, which causes a lot of problems. My husband is the dispatcher, and ...


2

Taking a different approach to your question: Your premise is based on the assumption that a child will believe everything written in a book is true. (Also that children live in a dream world only if they are lied to.) Where did you get this first idea? Did you believe this at one time? Do you know anyone who believed it at one time? The answer is probably ...


5

I would suggest a 3rd option. Our kids are bilingual in English (used in preschool) and Danish (used at home). They are currently 2 & 4. We speak almost only Danish to them, though we do read some some books in English. Both of them, when starting to speak, started in mostly Danish, then switched to some words in English, some in Danish. We never ...


5

There are many, many fictional tales that your child will encounter while growing up. Some are in books, some are in other media (TV, movies), some are cultural (e.g. the Tooth Fairy), some will be games that children and their friends make up. Even observing the world on her own can lead to the impression that there's something magical going on (sunrise! ...


6

Just talk with your kid. Have a lot of conversations. Kids have an amazing ability to digest language and separate words into the correct language. They also have the ability to be stubborn, willful and belligerent. If she doesn't want to speak it, you may not be able to change that yet. My daughter is fluent in a second language (her mother's) but it has ...


2

Just make sure you tell them it's not true, it's just a story. If you want, make it a game and let the kid try figure out what is possible and what isn't. Instead of shielding them from fiction, you have the perfect opportunity to teach them to make the difference between real and not real. Talk about the story the next day. Ask him what is his favorite ...


3

Your question seems to about whether children can tell the difference between truth and fiction. Children can tell the difference between truth and fiction. Children reading any story will maybe day dream about being the main character or a friend of the main character, but they will not make the mistake of thinking that the main character actually exists ...


0

It's really important that your child learns there is such a thing as fiction. Just because something is in a book (or on TV) doesn't mean it is true. Starting with things that are clearly and obviously not true (flying people, talking animals, etc) makes this an easy point to make. In the future, when your child sees an ad for something (online, on TV, ...


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According to the abstract of this study of 60 3-year-old children: From these experiments we conclude that children have the metalinguistic skills necessary to identify homonym pairs; moreover, they realized that homonyms represent two different categories. Finally, if children have a one-to-one mapping assumption, it is not strong enough to prevent them ...


3

I've tried in earnest to find studies to back up my following hypothesis, but I don't think I'm using the correct search terms. I believe that teaching your child more vocabulary now is much better than trying to teach them all that same vocabulary and their age-appropriate vocabulary 4 years years from now. There's a soft limit of how many new words per ...


1

Depends on your definition of "stuff" in "learning stuff". There's a good amount of study that explain that teaching academic to young kids isn't really necessary. What is important is that you teach/show character, or in other word executive function. If you can teach your kid self control (body/emotion), working hard, critical thinking and ...


3

I have found that it comes along as I have corrected my daughter's speech over the years as well. At the age of two I'd say she's doing just fine. According to this chart, she should be barely understandable. Sounds like your child's speech is on track, although it doesn't cover when you get into present versus past tense. According to this site, your ...


4

What a toddler should be learning should be nearly entirely focused on social development and physical development. Learning to play with others, learning to get along with others, learning to talk and communicate. Learning to run, skip, hop, jump, climb. Playing is a toddler's job, and primary method of learning. So if you're hell-bent on your toddler ...


3

A person's ability to learn and retain learning are inversely proportionate to their age. This doesn't mean you should start teaching your child collegiate-level philosophy, but it does mean you should try to take advantage of your child's openness to learning. Spending time with your child teaching them basic things is a good way to form a long-lasting ...


10

Searching "early formal academics" will provide quite a few resources on this subject. Moving up the Grades: Relationship between Preschool Model and Later School Success by Rebecca Marcon is a good representative source. A lot of parents feel like pushing more formalized education earlier gives the child a head start, but there's a growing body of ...


7

I'll answer your question with a question. University kids are able to learn advanced calculus and how to interpret difficult books and understand human psychology. Why don't I just wait until the kids are at that level, because then all of that high school maths will be so much easier for them? The reason is that knowledge builds upon knowledge. You lay ...


4

The reason it is "easy for them anyways" is because even if you invest no effort, the child is still learning on their own. These things that are "easy" aren't. They're really complicated for toddlers, it's just that toddlers spend almost all of their (awake) time learning. Helping them by giving them a lot of things to play around with (read: to learn ...


2

I was wondering why should I be hell bent on educating my toddler when she's going to learn the stuff anyways when she grows up? I don't know that there's great value in being "hell bent" about it, but certainly you shouldn't let the grass grow under your feet. The main value in educating young children is getting them to learn how to learn rather than ...


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Though I didn't find "Once Upon a Time" there, a great resource for getting age recommendations for movies/tv/games/books is Common Sense Media They provide parents' recommendations and kids' recommendations and a break down of what's in a lot of stuff.


1

Speaking very specifically to the issue of becoming a doctor, I think that one very common reason for children to become doctors is positive experiences with doctors during their childhood. Children who have a serious illness or some sort of chronic or structural issue that means they spend a lot of time with a particular doctor or set of doctors, and form ...


1

I guess your question can be interpreted in two ways: 1. Can you force a child to love something A lot of parents try this, but with limited success. Especially in a culture where everyone can do what they want, this is very likely to fail. If your child is surrounded by other children who don't have much of a choice, this may have a reasonable change to ...


3

The father wants the child to become a doctor. He is planning to create such an environment around the child such that the child starts thinking that she must become a doctor until she actually does. I think this is very unwise. Not only is it disrespecting her as a person, but it is also setting her up for hardship and possibly failure. Just as with ...


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Parents have a large influence on their children, but not as large as many people think. Biologically speaking, kids tend to be similar to their parents, and that includes sharing interests. Just because you do an activity with a child doesn't mean she wouldn't like it anyway. The converse is also true. If you don't like reading, your kids are at least a ...



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