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9

According to ADDitude Magazine, there are multiple things that one can do to help children with ADD write things. In the classroom: Set up a note system. Start small and build skills. Demonstrate essay-writing. Give writing prompts. Encourage colourful descriptions. Explain the writing process. Allow enough time. Don't grade early work. ...


8

So Far, So Good Seems to me like given the circumstances, things are already looking up and pretty great. I wouldn't recommend asking him to treat you like a father, because you just aren't his father. You do, however, deserve that he treats you with respect just like he should treat other people with respect, and just like he should treat authoritarian ...


8

I have the same concern with my children with ADD for similar reasons. I found that playing games like Candy Land, Chutes and Ladders, Zingo and as they get a bit older games like Guess Who, Sorry, and games of that ilk really help them. They enjoy the personal experience they have with a parent and they learn to sit, wait their turn, and finish out a ...


5

As a former preschool teacher I'd like first to point out that toddlers are known for having little to no attention span ADHD or not. As a teacher that spent time in a specialized classroom with middle school students where a majority of my students had severe ADHD in addition to other learning/behavioral disabilities, the first and most important things ...


5

I have an 8yr old boy without ADHD and still get some of that. First off, understand. Make sure you fully comprehend how your child sees you and your actions, and how he feels towards you and your actions. Put yourself in his shoes. Be him. You can't really make him understand you unless you first understand him and make sure he knows that you really do ...


4

Some kids really do need the medication, but others can adapt and do well with some adjustments to their environment and the expectations set on them. While these things aren't information about medicating, you could see if trying some of these options helps enough that you can put off medicating for another year or two or see if you don't need to medicate ...


4

Both of my sons (now 12 and 9) are ADHD and both have been taking medication (Concerta) daily for about three years. My older son had behavioural issues since kindergarten, but teachers always told us how bright he was. His marks were fine but he was continually getting in trouble, and was suspended a number of times for violent behaviour. He was as ...


3

It is unlikely it is ADHD, but the only one to diagnose that is a trained therapist (which I am not). It is extremely rare that ADHD is diagnosed first in adults, but it does happen (as it did with me, for example.) ADHD, however, isn't the only mental "illness" out there, as I am sure you know. Therapy is unlikely to hurt, so why not try it? Something ...


3

The solution is to develop a curriculum that's less about sitting still and reading quietly and more about hands-on discovery and invention. In the US, that can be tricky, depending on where you live. In major cities, you may have luck finding schools that cater more to that type of learning style. While not specifically about ADD, this article in SLATE ...


3

I think when it comes to kids with ADD/ADHD, it's important to teach them coping mechanisms. I've known kids who memorized baseball stats because they were REALLY into baseball and this was able to help them focus. I've taught students who would doodle/draw to help keep them focused, but they were still listening and paying attention. Generally, a good ...


3

I've worked at a school for kids with learning differences (mostly ADHD), and here are some suggestions that we've used: 1) Try to have the child seated as close to the teacher as possible. It makes paying attention come more naturally, and makes is easier for the teacher to refocus the child without singling them out. A simple tap on the desk or eye ...


3

Some techniques that have worked with our 8 year old girl, with an ADHD diagnosis, to make the writing process easier. And when the writing is easier, the effort to get her to do it is also easier. Using ruled paper - it helps when she has boundaries for writing. A weighted writing wrist band and a pencil holder - helps with legibility. Writing in short ...


2

I had a classroom devoted to severe ADHD cases for three years. This is how I thought about it and handled things for many of my kids. This is also the basics of the techniques I am using with my own daughter that is going to be evaluated shortly and has been struggling significantly with writing done in the "traditional way." Since switching to some ...


2

"How do you decide whether or not to medicate your child?" Your gut. Honestly, I think that's the best that any parent can do right now. If your child can't see the blackboard, you don't question getting them glasses, but when it comes to mental health, it's a much fuzzier, grayer world of diagnosis and treatment options and it's a challenge. I have ADD ...


2

This sounds exactly like my house, down to the 8 and 5 year olds. Only I have girls. Unfortunately, I don't really have any answers for you, only sympathy and letting you know that you're not alone. First, keep in contact with your doctor about the medication. If what your son is taking isn't working well enough, then it needs adjusted. You may need ...


2

Seems that you didn't sign up for any of this, nor did your wife. But you're doing what you think is best for an individual that needs it. I'm not going to try to address the specific points, but to give one point of foundational advice based on what you've written: He has no family. Be his family. The easy part: Consider his maternal unit out of the ...


2

You might try drilling: repeatedly doing the same sequence of steps in a task as fast as possible. The repetitions don't have to be back to back, but pick a couple of rote daily tasks and do it every day or every other day for a few days or as long as it might be enjoyable/acceptable. We do this with my eldest (as a fun game) to see how fast he can get ...


1

There is an iPad app called KidToDo (kidtodo.com) that might help. It is a photo based todo list for kids. You can take photos to create visual lists of the routine things that she needs to do to get ready for school or sports or bed. Each time she needs to execute on any of those she can refer to the app. The kid receives a well done message and a sticker ...


1

I think this is a fascinating question because I know I do it and my 6-year-old does it as well. I think we all do this to some extent. But, you're right, the difference is that, as an adult, you can identify the problem and deal with it. The guidance counselor at my son's school recently did a talk on this topic geared more for older elementary ...


1

I recognize this problem, both in myself and in my eldest son. Both of us have been found by one of our parents, a sock on one foot, the other sock in our hands, hovering near the other foot, reading a (comic) book. As you said, it's not a problem of motivation. And although your patience is beginning to wear thin, what I found that does help is a constant ...


1

First of all, I think you're doing a great job all things considered! Look at it this way: before you took him in, he was skipping school altogether, getting in trouble with the police and he's not doing that anymore. From what you say, he sounds like a sweet, bright kid. I agree with haylem that you cannot expect to step in at this point and become his ...


1

Helpguide.org listed a detailed information on how you can deal with your child having ADHD. The behavioral problems that you mentioned are the manifestations of having ADHD. Actually, ADHD children, if properly trained can be organized and obedient, but the problem is, they don't know how to do it. Thus, as a parent, you really need to have lots of ...


1

First, I want to express that I know this is hard but as parents there are certain times when taking a deep breath and taking a little time off isn't a luxury but a requirement. Get some time away from it all to decompress a little. Secondly, I would like to stress Brian White's point that making sure you listen and understand how he is feeling regularly ...


1

I'm pushing 40 and I still have these issues. If there was a way to 'learn' how to fix ADD, I'd sure love to see it. ;) Alas, there really isn't. There's coping strategies, though. A big one that really helps all children (and many of us ADD adults) is a consistent schedule. Perhaps set up a daily schedule and put it up on the wall. 8:30 breakfast. 8:45 get ...


1

Maria Montessori as you know was the first woman physician in Italy. In what became her life-work, she accepted children who had been cast off by the public education system at the time and worked what were considered "miracles" when, in reality, all she did was listen, follow, prepare an environment, and mentor. Of note was her continual examination and ...


1

First, I would stop talking about ADD. It is what it is. All you do by talking about it is prime everyone for failure. I am not saying it doesn't exist, or that it isn't relevant. I am saying that nothing can be done about it, so move on. As much as folks would like to think otherwise, and as much as some are trying to legislate otherwise, the world isn't ...



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