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Find a university/college near you and check out their local ACM chapter. They may have high school outreach programs like the ACM high school programming contest. Even if they don't have anything specific for high school students, you are pretty close to being able to dual enroll. I highly suggest you dual enroll and take some courses. This will expand your ...


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One option left out by other answers is to join or start a FIRST Robotics team. This competition happens yearly, and has forged paths that allow high school students to receive mentorship from professionals in the programming, mechanical engineering, computer, and electronic industries. The value of joining or starting such a team is that the program is ...


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In my town there is a teenage center for kids who want to learn technology. It's like an after-school meetup sort of thing, just geared towards kids instead of the usual technical meetup, which is geared towards professionals.


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If the people you are looking for don't exist, you can create them. Meaning if your child is ready and confident about it, he could lead a small group to teach others about how to program. His/her teachers could help him get the basics started to put together a group.


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Just another idea: A few years ago I took part in a Startup Weekend. My areas of expertise were not very applicable at the time, so it wasn't an amazing experience for me, but I think your child's knowledge would be very well suited to this. I tried to find an age limit, but all I could find was "Startup Weekend does not discriminate on the basis of ...


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All above suggestions are useful, but if you are in the Austin or El Paso areas, you can go along to the Coderdojo there. If not and you can find some like minded kids and parents, you might consider starting one in your own area. See details at https://zen.coderdojo.com/dojo I run one in my area of Sallins, Naas (in Co Kildare. Ireland) and from 4 kids ...


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This is by no means an authoritative answer - I don't really know you - I'll just offer suggestions (and a bit of opinion)... From the parent point of view Don't worry, peers will come at university or college. Finding people at the same skill level can be very difficult at this stage. First off, find the motivation, maybe the reason to find people with ...


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Two caveats: I'm not a parent. I know nothing about raising kids. (But I do know about geeks.) I'm not sure if the question was aimed at meeting people your age, or any age. I'm assuming you are open to meeting and interacting with older teens and adults. Elevator Pitch Having truly productive programming skills at your age is unusual. More common is to ...


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I'm 15, and I had this same problem about a year ago. There's an awesome community called HS Hackers on Facebook. To call it lifechanging would be a gross understatement. Hackathons are the best way to meet other talented (and often young) programmers. Hackathons are basically coding marathons. The best event to go to would be a CodeDay. It's a 24 hour ...


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Go to a hackerspace. They are everywhere in the world, and they are places where 'hackers' meet, in the sense of good-willing computer experts. It's mostly adults, but if you are lucky there are also some teens. There are plenty of projects to work on, such as programming software, 3D printers, soldering, etc. And other people can participate in your ...


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When your skill level is beyond what is considered normal for your age group, you have to do your in-person networking the same way the adults do Work Conferences Workshops/classes Meet-ups etc. However, given your age, you might have a difficult time socializing with the people you will meet this way. People will assume that you're there with your ...


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I meet people at local meetups. Where I live there are about three Python meetups a month. My experiences have been great: excellent programmers who just like to talk shop. While you will likely meet others at your skill level, you won't meet people at your age level. It will mostly be older people (e.g. college age or higher), but if the goal is to talk ...


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Contact your local library. It is part of a library's mission to promote education, to facilitate knowledge creation, and to foster a sense of community. They run interest groups of all kinds, and if your local library is large enough, they will likely even have a tech guru of some kind on staff. If you can get a group started in the library, you have the ...


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I do not want to say that you are out-of-luck, but you are pretty much out-of-luck. The issue is that most people around your age do not know those languages. In fact, most people around your age likely do not even know what most of them are. If you asked most 14-year olds what Vim or LaTeX is, many of them would have no clue at all. Some might know what ...


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I'm currently one year below your age, and I've been programming since I was eight years old. I currently hold knowledge in PHP, HTML, CSS, JavaScript, jQuery and Java mainly although I have little knowledge in other languages, too. Being in your position, it's not usual that you find somebody who is our age with our knowledge levels. Usually, I find ...


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I don't know where you live or what logistics you have to deal with, but let me suggest that you try to drop some of the constraints around doing the things you want to do. For example, if you live in a house with a yard, why not go out and play in that yard for ten or fifteen minutes even before anyone has any breakfast? Start the day with something fun for ...


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Thanks for posting this question! I also get tired from the constant coaxing, when my son is in that sort of phase. Have you perhaps tried involving your older child in helping with the younger one? With lots of instructions and praise, and lots of explanations why it's important to do things such as finish breakfast. It would give him the attention that ...


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Well I certainly identify with this one! My daughters are 3 and 6 and we get a lot of this. Not so much on school mornings but definitely on holiday mornings. It's worse in the winter because there's more coats etc to put on. I'm assuming you're already helping the 2-year-old quite a lot, and only expecting them to do really simple things by/for themselves? ...


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I think the first step is recognizing that your desires are in conflict with your children's. You are craving some special event time, and they have been craving unstructured time. It's natural and okay to have conflicting desires with your family, just be aware the conflict exists and make a conscious choice about whose needs are going to be paramount at ...


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I hear your frustration! I have a 5 year old daughter who is slower than molasses waiting on Christmas. The mornings have turned into a routine for us though. She used to get up and want to watch a show on TV before getting breakfast. We quickly learned that this led to her watching her show and not eating. So we put the rule in place that she couldn't watch ...



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