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2

As I go for work i will be busy in my work after reaching home. When I get time I spend the whole day with my DS. I just find it hard for the activities but I go online for the activities so that I can engage my kid and has lot of fun. I would like to share few of the activities that i do with my son. I use to play Indoor basket ball: This one of the best ...


1

One of the most important devolopment of a toddler is his/her visual imagery. Even before they could speak, they could watch. Museums having displays of various kinds are surely going to tickle their minds, arouse curiosity. There is no harm in this at all. The more stuff they see, more things they understand in the longer run. Getting their minds ...


0

At some magical time between toddler hood and being a young child, they will be ready. Take them a bit early to get in the habit of going to the museum so that when they cross the threshold, they'll be ready. But don't take them too early because it is a waste of their time. Be wary of doing activities with prestige-- symphonies, reading prestige literature ...


4

I'm intrigued by Erica's challenge to list reasons why museums can be a bad idea for kids. We'll need to assume the average museum here, not a children's museum, a science museum (bring 'em on!), or a museum with programs for kids. Kids kind of need to be in strollers or arms, unless you want dirty looks. In strollers, from their vantage point, they must ...


4

Especially with art museums, you can easily construct games that will make things more interesting. For example, keep a running tally of the appearances of Baby Jesus and Baby John the Baptist--counting is fun, and babies are fun. And then when your kid is old they'll realize you sneakily taught them how to recognize the art historical customs for ...


4

We visit quite a few museums with our kids. You might be surprised at the experience. Some museums are very clearly geared toward adults, but the vast majority make a great deal of effort to appeal to all ages. They are designed as places for active learning rather than shrines for silent pondering. Even if the kids don't learn anything directly, they ...


5

In contrast to most of the other answers, I don't come with statistics or scientific basis for my response, simply a personal anecdote from last weekend. If the museum is reasonably child friendly, and it aligns with things that hold the child's interests in a way that's accessible to them, it can be great. As an example, here in town there's the National ...


28

I started looking into research relating to the value that toddlers might get from a museum visit, and I'm almost overwhelmed by the number of quotes and discussions I found (much of it from the museum's perspective). The Importance of Taking Children to Museums from the National Endowment for the Arts Art Works Blog (the post includes links to a great ...


12

Yes, visiting an art gallery or history museum is great for toddlers. We live in London and are blessed with a huge number of world class free museums and I would say that taking a toddler to a museum is an amazing experience for both parents and toddler. You will be surprised by how rewarding it is for all of you. We have been taking our daughter to ...


1

In general in museums you: have to be silent can't run (at least it's frowned upon) can't touch anything mustn't destroy anything! spend a lot of time (hours or even a day or two - like in Louvre) Which of these things seem to be compatible with toddlers? :) I once visited toys museum with my (then) girlfriend. I guess our toddler would have some fun ...


-3

Music lessons and children often don't seem to mix, especially when it's practice time. It's really the same as anything else in family life, really. Children follow parental examples, and it's no different in music or any other art form requiring years of cultivation. Parents who wish for their children to become athletes are usually sports enthusiasts ...


3

Most of the advice before me is good advice. Here is my 2 cents. As a father with two high school dancers that have danced since age 3 - one daughter just shows up. The other daughter practices before dance class and then practices after dance class. The daughter that just shows up - she's tired of dance and does not want to dance after high school. ...


1

"How do I convince my eleven-year-old to practice her dancing?" How about, don't? Let her decide for herself if she wants to invest the time practicing. You can push her, but she will resent you for it. Simply tell her that all the best dancers practice and stretch, so if she wants to be the best she should emulate them, otherwise she can just do it for ...


1

I'm not going to tell you to deliver an ultimatum, but... You are in a sense enabling the behavior. You could move her to a different studio as the other answers suggested, but if you are that concerned with your daughter going through the motions you could simply stop supporting her in doing so. Even if you are so financially well-off that the money is ...


7

I can speak from experience as someone who has had multiple talents, but is lazy: I do things because I enjoy them. I, for example, rarely did anything with my clarinet for the sake of becoming a better clarinetist. The music we were going to perform? I played it because I enjoyed playing it. I never really practiced for an abstract sense of becoming ...


11

There's a common saying among highly-successful people, which is to never be the smartest person in the room. You grow by surrounding yourself with people who challenge you to be better. Somewhat counterintuitively, if you want to be truly successful, you need to fail sometimes. If you never fail, you're not pushing your boundaries. You're playing it too ...


15

This can be a common issue in children who are very successful in almost anything: when they are motivated by success, and that success is easy to achieve, they see no reason to work hard to achieve basically the same success. The returns for additional success tend to be diminishing; being a big fish in a small pond can be very comfortable to someone ...



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