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If I have a child who is consistently made fun of at school, what should I do to help my child learn to cope, ignore, or respond to the situation. What should I do to help prevent the situation from continuing?

Update: To be more specific, I want to know how to react if a teenage child (ages 13-18) is made fun of because of some non-modifiable (surgery excluded) aspect of their physical appearance. Examples might include a large nose, pronounced ears, or a physical deformity.

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How old is the child? –  HedgeMage Apr 11 '11 at 0:33
    
I was just asking in general, so the answer may suggest different strategies for different age ranges. –  Javid Jamae Apr 11 '11 at 2:06
    
After a lot of thought, I've voted to close this as not a real question (too vague). Without knowing details like the age of the child, the type of teasing, etc. it is impossible to give a good recommendation. This is along the lines of what is warned about in the beta notice -- asking "fake" questions -- in that because there is no specific case that this question is directed toward, it is by nature too vague to be useful. –  HedgeMage Apr 12 '11 at 4:01
    
@HedgeMage - That's fair... I updated the question to be more specific. –  Javid Jamae Apr 16 '11 at 0:35

4 Answers 4

This question was asked on the Dr Jenn show on Cosmo radio on Sirius XM. Most of this response is paraphrased and expanded from the answer of Dr Jenn on that show, while the rest is personal experience and opinion. There are multiple levels to this answer depending on the type of teasing and even the gender of the child. Boys and girls tend to tease each other different as children.

Boys tend to do it as a show of aggressive dominance. One way to cope with this teasing is to show the boy how to stick up for themselves to the teasing person. Sometimes this display of power is enough to stop the teasing. However, you do not want to condone or support fighting.

For girls, it's far more subtle and manipulative, with the teasing girls tending to complete exclude the teased girl. This can be very difficult for the teased person to cope with because there is no good way to break up he group-think of a group of girls who are being coerced into excluding a girl.

So, the first level would be something like discussing the issue with your child about the types of teasing, why the teasing is occurring, and what they may be able to do to prevent it or turn it around. It's important to identify the source of the taunting: is it due to weight issues? Appearance? Socio-Economic Status? Hobbies? Sometimes, it can be due to something your child is doing that you didn't know about such as acting up in class, teasing other kids, or not playing nicely with others. This can be tricky and multifaceted, so it's important to try to probe past rationalizations and excuses that may be at the forefront to find any simple, teachable lessons that may be at the root of the bullying.

The second level may be something like talking to the parents of children who are teasing your kids or talking to all parents at some form of PTA meeting or similar grouping.

The third level is discussing the issue with the teacher of the class to see if there's anything the teacher can do to watch for and diffuse the teasing behavior.

The fourth level is discussing the issue with the principal. Usually for extreme cases of bullying, the schools have some resources available to help children. This includes stuff like adult shadows that will roughly follow the child around to diffuse bullying. The reason being that kids will generally not tease kids when there is a grownup around.

The fifth level if nothing has worked so far is to look into other schools in the area that may have better resources to combat bullying. This should be for only the most systemic, repeated, and severe cases of bullying. Of course, if you've made it this far in the process, then the bullying must be terrible at this point, and the previous school was dangerously negligent. At this tier there is also the opportunity for legal action against the school for not providing a safe learning environment for your child.

Overall, the most important thing at any level of this process is to make sure your child knows that you trust them, believe them, love them, and will protect them no matter what happens. When children know that their parents are behind them, their ability to withstand teasing is significantly greater. You want to resist overreacting, but you also want to resist just telling your child to "toughen up" or "deal with it" or "just ignore it" or things like that may show you as callous or downplay the issues the child is facing.

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-1 for suggesting bringing it up at a PTA meeting (talk about involving a ton of people having nothing to do with the situation!) let alone before the teacher has been spoken to, not mentioning self-defense as an option, and other issues. –  HedgeMage Apr 11 '11 at 0:36
    
A display of power without condoning fighting? How exactly is that supposed to work? –  Lennart Regebro Apr 11 '11 at 9:02
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Nonviolent power could also be self-assertiveness; knowing (and showing) that you can call me whatever you like and I won't care because I know that you're only trying to tease me and I know that what you say is wrong. –  Torben Gundtofte-Bruun Apr 11 '11 at 11:09
    
@HedgeMage Don't -1 someone for your personal opinions. pta.org/Do_As_A_PTA_Leader.pdf greatschools.org/elementary-school/community/… bellmore.patch.com/articles/… books.google.com/… –  user445 Apr 11 '11 at 12:45
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@takk: My experience working in several school districts tells me that speaking at a PTA meeting is ineffective for this sort of thing, and would cause backlash from both school staff (who were just made to look ineffectual over something they were never even approached about) and the parenting community (who have no power to do anything about the situation anyway). It's an informed and reasoned opinion. –  HedgeMage Apr 11 '11 at 14:21

I'm very unsure about this, so this is a tentative answer, and I don't have any research to back it up or anything. Based on nothing but my observations during childhood, I think the first step is to figure out why the child is being teased. And I'm not talking about what he/she is being teased about, like glasses or pants or hair color, which rarely is the same thing.

To a large degree it seems to me that the teasing comes from the child being bad at social interactions and socializing. Some kids do not understand what the other kids wants from them. Usually what they want is that the child joins in and conform. They want other kids to play football, cheer for a team, listen to a select group of approved "artists de jour" and generally just be just like them. Kids who are uninterested in sport, read science fiction, and listen to some other music doesn't fit into the box.

And unless you can make all the kids in school understand that people are different and shouldn't be put into boxes, every kid will be put into a box that the other kids can understand. In big schools you may have several boxes. US high schools you apparently often have different groups, like jocks and nerds, etc, and people will mostly fit into one of these boxes and socialize there. Although different groups then can clash, that's an altogether different problem from the problem of when one kid doesn't fit into any of the boxes, which is the real problem. They will then end up in an outcast/teased/bullied box, and that is not a good place to be.

In that case the kid will have to be taught how to socialize and how to fit into a positive box. Perhaps by pretending to be interested in sports, etc (In fact, most major sports become interesting once you know enough about them, which is good to know).

If this doesn't help, you may need to find another school, because it can be hard to get out of a box, if you are in one. Changing schools to a place nobody knows you can help you get out of the box, but only if you understand socializing or you'll just en up in the "weirdo"-box again. And this goes not just for bullied, but also bullies. In my 3rd year, one of the bullies of my class was moved to another school, because he had gone to special ed classes there, and there he hadn't bullied anyone, he somehow found a non-bullying box to be in, and like it much better.

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By the time one is a teenager, one should be able to comprehend that some people are just jerks. That realization is a good thing. Too many people go through life doing stupid or downright self-destructive things in the name of being liked.

What is most important for your teen is to have a great social group of his/her own. It's the difference between "the world hates me" and sitting with your friends grumbling about the jerks over there who are so much less cool/intelligent/whatever than you are. If that hasn't happened at school, let him/her pick out activities that he/she really likes and take a class or join a club/team. It may take a few for your teen to find his/her niche, but in the end it will be worth it.

If the teasing at school gets to the point where it's interfering with learning or safety (physical confrontations, threats, vandalism, etc.) then talk to the school about it (or better yet -- give your teen the chance to be his/her own advocate, and step in if the school is not responsive). If it's just annoying, there's the old saying about sticks and stones.

You can't make everyone your kid meets be a decent human being. You can teach your child the difference between things that matter (safety, education, etc.) and things that don't (loud-mouth jerks), and make sure he/she has the coping skills to deal with whatever comes around.

Part of being an adult is choosing who you will, and who you won't, have as part of your life.

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I don't really feel like you're answering the question. You're saying things that my child should feel, then you're saying that I can tell them to ignore the loud-mouth jerks. But, you never answer the question of how to approach my child and actually have the conversation. When your child is constantly teased in school for their appearance throughout their teenage years (like I was), it's not as simple as repeatedly reminding your child about "sticks and stones". I'm really looking for better ways to talk to my children if they encounter these situations as teenagers. –  Javid Jamae Apr 17 '11 at 2:49
    
@Javid: You asked "What should I do to help prevent the situation from continuing?" -- but you can't prevent it, period. The best thing to do is to give your child what they need to cope, which is what I outlined. It's high school, and high schoolers are jerks. Avoiding teasing means valuing and embodying only what the mainstream does, which is a pretty pathetic set of criteria. Yes, getting teased sucks, and there isn't anything you can do to make it less painful -- you can only make sure your child has real friends, and doesn't let others' words define him/her. –  HedgeMage Apr 17 '11 at 17:27
    
The first part of my quesiton was "what should I do to help my child learn to cope, ignore, or respond to the situation". Your answer was "make sure he/she has the coping skills to deal with whatever comes around." Sorry, but that just restates the question. I'm looking for answer that explains how to help them gain the coping skills and specific things you can say and do to help them. Yes, having a social group of his/her own is helpful, but that doesn't necessarily help them cope with the teasing. Sometimes teasing can also come from within their social group, which hurts more. –  Javid Jamae Apr 18 '11 at 0:27

I see the issues that others are having in answering this question. There is more information that is needed to provide help.

How long has this issue existed? What actions have you already tried? How active are you (the parents) in schooling? Is it a specific child that is picking on your teen or is it a group? Is the teasing on a mental or physical level?

How has your child been dealing with the situation to date? If it doesn't get corrected, what do you see happening as a result?

I would suggest a meeting with the guidance counselor and escalating the situation from there.

Most of all, talk with your child about what they are experience and feeling. Let them know you are there for them and will do your best to help them through this difficult time.

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