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My daughter seems to be starting to teethe. She's 7 weeks old and hasn't quite figured out teething toys and we don't want to start with drugs or other medications. We've had numerous friends suggest to us getting an amber necklace/bracelet for my daughter to wear. I'm feeling somewhat sceptical about the whole succinic acid thing. Wondering if anyone here has had any experience with them or links to any science/studies behind them.

Thanks!

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parenting.stackexchange.com/questions/4704/… has some good suggestions for natural teething aids. –  Bryce Jun 26 '12 at 17:40
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7 weeks old and teething? Are you sure? Seems early to me. –  Mr. Shiny and New 安宇 Jun 26 '12 at 18:13
    
7 weeks seems early to me too, but she seems to be doing everything early. And from what I read it's very possible (while not the norm). –  talon8 Jun 26 '12 at 19:31
    
If she takes a pacifier consider chilling it in the fridge for relief, or hold a chilled wash cloth in her mouth yourself. From what I've read it also is pretty common for first-time parents to mistake other things for teething. 7 weeks is a pretty standard fussy time associated with Wonder Week 8 –  justkt Jun 26 '12 at 20:27

2 Answers 2

These necklaces do not work to help teething. Skeptics.SE had an identical question and it was determined that there is no reliable evidence backing the claim.

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I've read and seen on T.V., information that says they definitely do not work.

The anaesthetic properties in the amber do not come into effect until the amber becomes super heated, and that's not going to happen in your child's mouth!

I would also be very concerned about the choking hazard they present, and the risk of strangulation they cause.

But that's just my 2 cents...

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Apparently they aren't even supposed to be put into the mouth, but rather worn against the skin, allowing "essential oils to be absorbed through the skin". If mmr had not already linked to skeptics.se, I would have immediately brought it there as well, as it sounds like a pretty absurd claim to me. –  Beofett Jun 27 '12 at 14:32
    
+1 for the strangulation/choking hazard. –  Torben Gundtofte-Bruun Jun 27 '12 at 15:10

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