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My wife and I are on different schedules which during the week leaves one parent alone with the twins. Feeding the twins bottles at the same time has proven to be relatively easy. We are now in the process of introducing solid foods. This has proven challenging for one of the twins and is proving challenging for us. Spoon feeding is obviously not as simple as holding onto two bottles, but requires interaction for each bite.

We see our options as:

  • alternating between each bite
  • feeding one and then the other
  • spoon feeding at totally different times

Is there an option we are missing? Is there a better way?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

With twins, it's going to be chaotic sometimes. Don't worry too much and go with the flow. Try and see what works (the next day it may be all different :-)

It really depends on their personalities - one may be fast eater while the other is slow. One may be eager to try out new tastes, while the other reluctant (as you note in your other post). One may like veggies more, the other fruits or grains. One may be determined to grab the spoon and start performing her own show with it (not necessarily related to eating :-), while the other more passive. No need to force things according to some preset plan. You and them together will work out a more or less consistent daily routine after a while.

One general note: it is useful to serve them from different plates / bottles, to be able to follow how much each is eating.

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I have a set of almost 2 year old twins and here is a list of what worked best for us when they were starting out.

Alternate bites

We mix up one bowl of the food we are going to spoon feed them and alternate bites. I had them in high chairs next to each other and sat in front of them so I could reach each one at any time.

Finger foods

We found that having some kind of finger food on the tray at the same time worked the best. It meant that each boy would eat a piece of finger food while waiting for his cereal/yogurt.

Let them feed themselves

We allowed our boys to eat grown up food from almost day one. We didn't want them to expect us to feed them each and every bite. At each meal I made sure that there was something on the table that they could eat. I used some of the tenants of baby led weaning. The only thing that we spoon fed them was yogurt, cereal, and soups and we would help them get the rest of the food to their mouths when they had trouble.

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Being a twin, I've just asked my parents what they did:

Use one spoon and feed both twins alternatingly, when only one parent is available. When both parets are there, feed the twins simultaneously.

It worked for my parents; my sibling and I survived :-)

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Thank you Yulia for the clear-sighted edit! :):) –  Torben Gundtofte-Bruun Jan 18 '12 at 19:15
    
This is exactly what our mom did, too: two bowls, one spoon, alternately stuff one mouth, then the other. –  Martha Jan 19 '12 at 15:38
    
It seems that the children typically do survive. It's the parent's that are scarred in the end! :) j/k –  Daniel Standage Jan 24 '12 at 16:24
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