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Since my wife is pregnant, I've been sleeping a lot more. I feel tired much much earlier (around 9~10 instead of midnight).

Is this a documented known reaction? I've heard of/seen men gain weight, but not of this tiredness.

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Keep in mind while it can be psychological (Couvade); emotions can be taxing on the human body. With increased emotions, planning, etc... feeling tired is the bodies normal coping mechanism as it is being demanded of like never before. –  Aaron McIver Mar 31 '11 at 19:17
    
Great questions. I have experienced the same thing recently. I didn't realize that sleeping could be part of the "sympathy pains." –  Jason Apr 6 '11 at 12:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 16 down vote accepted

This is documented, and is known as Couvade syndrome:

Couvade syndrome, also called sympathetic pregnancy, is a proposed condition in which a partner experiences some of the same symptoms and behavior of an expectant mother. These most often include minor weight gain, altered hormone levels, morning nausea, and disturbed sleep patterns. In more extreme cases, symptoms can include labor pains, postpartum depression, and nosebleeds.

The Wikipedia article has some interesting information and links to additional reading.

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Thanks. It does mention "disturbed sleep patterns". –  luispedro Mar 31 '11 at 18:38
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If you and your wife sleep in the same bed (common but not necessarily universal), keep in mind she's not sleeping very soundly either; she's getting up to go to the bathroom, puke, eat, whatever baby's telling her to do, and beyond the first trimester, there's a lot going on in that uterus, causing discomfort in turn causing position shifts. All that is happening inches away from you; it's bound to jerk you out of deep sleep into something lighter, or even wake you up. Even if you or your wife don't remember you waking up in the middle of the night, it's happening. –  KeithS Jul 31 '13 at 23:28
    
While I'd agree this could be the reason, the OP doesn't tell us if there are other factors we should consider and that may be more grim. Extended workload because of the pregnancy, signals of depression, etc... As nothing is said it's fair to assume every thing is bright under the sun, but who knows? –  haylem Sep 17 '13 at 23:12
    
I added a short summary from Wikipedia. We generally prefer to have the relevant text right here on the site. The usual argument is that the source site might disappear and take the wisdom with it. Wikipedia might be more stable but you never know. –  Torben Gundtofte-Bruun Sep 19 '13 at 12:26

in my personal experience, I wound up spending a lot more time at home while my wife was pregnant, and I also slept a lot more. for me, the answer was simple, and I think distinct from sympathetic pregnancy: we live in NYC and lead a very active social life. while she was pregnant, we didn't have as many activities, so I would fall asleep watching TV or reading.

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How many hours do you sleep. 8 hours is normal in most cultures. During the early years a lot of tiresome activies take place that simply ask for more sleep. During the pregnancy I slept a whole lot more wich was great once the little kid was born.

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It also depends on the person, not just the culture; if I only get 8 hours' sleep in a night I'm worthless the next morning. 10 hours is normal for many people, and some honestly need up to 12 "horizontal" hours a night to feel fully rested (though if you need to actually sleep for 12 hours a day you might consider a sleep study to see if there's some reason why less sleep isn't doing it for you) –  KeithS Jul 31 '13 at 22:35

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