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Our 2,5 years old kid is often wetting his pants. He wears diapers during noon-sleep and night-sleep but none when awake. He knows how to call for the potty. Nearly never do the big thing in his pants but the small thing often passes through.

Shall we push forward and avoid diapers in bed too? Or let him wet for sometime so he feels more the annoyance? (I suspect he likes us to change his pants) Or just wait for this issue to go away by itself?

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First of all night time: A child has no control at night until his body does it for him, so stopping the diapers at night is just going to bother him and you. My 4 year old daughter (girls usually have control at an early age then boys) still needs a diaper at night and the pediatrician says they don't worry about it until age 6 and even then don't do anything about it.

Second, in terms of accidents at daytime: It sounds to me like he does like the attention of having his pants changed by you. Two ideas, can he change his pants himself? If so keep pants and underpants in the bathroom and let him handle the whole process himself. If he can't change himself try a sticker chart everytime he does make on the potty and don't talk while changing his pants and do not interact with him so that he is not getting extra attention while having his pants changed and he does get positive attention when he makes in the potty. I found with my two year old he was able to wait 26 stickers for a spider man action figure that he wanted.

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I am not very much into bargaining and rewarding, when I can avoid this artificial tricks. However, I note the idea to make changing pant less comforting for him, and will tell his mother. –  Guillaume Dec 18 '11 at 3:20
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