Take the 2-minute tour ×
Parenting Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for parents, grandparents, nannies and others with a parenting role. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We are working on potty training our two year old girl and it is interfering with our bedtime routine. She will often keep requesting to use the potty, knowing that we will take her out of bed to go to the bathroom, sometimes as many as four times in a night. It became obvious pretty quickly that she was just delaying bedtime because she would just try and talk with us while on the potty and make jokes. We have been trying to make it as boring as possible, by standing out in the hall so that she does not have someone to directly interact with while on the potty.

How can we reduce the number of times we take her to the potty after putting her to bed without giving her a complex about the toilet? I am afraid to deny her the extra potty runs since sometimes she actually does go on the extra times (thought more often not).

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 9 down vote accepted

"Ok, one more trip and then straight to bed." worked well for us... not only with the potty but also with "I'm thirsty" and "I need to give mommy a kiss good night" and ... all his other stalling tactics. Basically he realized that whatever thing he wanted to do to stall getting to bed would replace the next story I was about to read, and make it the last thing before lights out. He would rather have the stories and he knew I'd read more stories if he stayed in bed. As soon as we realized he was stalling and not actually needing whatever, boom, cut off. He very quickly stopped stalling entirely... quite often now he falls asleep listening to stories.

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent advice. Even very young kids grasp the idea of "trading" or choosing -- get one of two things but not both. –  Torben Gundtofte-Bruun Aug 8 '11 at 19:59
    
It's what we've done successfully with our son, they all try it and you just have to put a stop on it at some point so they know you will not always respond. –  MichaelF Aug 10 '11 at 8:59
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.