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My 9-mo has been chewing on anything that comes his way for the past 2 months now. We initially thought this was because he would be teething soon. But nothing has come up yet.

Should I be giving him any calcium supplements to help with the process or it'll just take its time? Right now he feeds on breast milk, mashed fruits and veggies and baby food.

Thanks.

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Had specified teething as a tag but didn't have enough reps to create a new tag so had to go with teeth... Thanks for tagging it right! –  lostInTransit Jul 29 '11 at 7:32
    
Yeah we didn't have that tag - but now we do! –  Torben Gundtofte-Bruun Jul 29 '11 at 10:43
    
In Poland there is something called "Bobodent" which you can rub on the gums to help relieve the teething pains. It turns out to contain extract of Chamomille (anti-inflammatory it seems), Thymol (anti-bacterial) and Lidocaine (pain-killer/itching-relief). It's awesome! See if something similar is available in your country. –  Lennart Regebro Jul 30 '11 at 8:13
    
In Austria it's called Dentinox and I agree it's fantastic. Use sparingly. –  Torben Gundtofte-Bruun Aug 4 '11 at 21:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your description sounds like teething all right, and it fits with the age. Teething can take a long time, and can be invisible for a good part of that time.

I've not heard of calcium supplements for teething, but your pediatrician likely has a professional opinion on that.

As for foods, you can try giving him something that has a little bit of consistency, like small pieces of well-boiled potato. He can chew that with his gums, even without teeth. Try increasing the firmness of foods to see what his preferences are, but be careful that he doesn't choke.

You can also offer suitable teething toys - objects with different shapes, textures, and firmness that are interesting for the baby to explore with the mouth. Many such toys can be stored in the refrigerator so that their coolness has a nice soothing effect on the gums.

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he does use teething toys and I have started introducing soft solid food as well. He likes food, no matter the taste or consistency :) I go to the ped next week and will ask him about this but thought I'd get an opinion from parents here as well! Thanks. –  lostInTransit Jul 29 '11 at 7:30

Like Torben's said, it definitely sounds like teething.

Unfortunately, there's no way to 'speed' it up - until the teeth bud and erupt, your son is going to drool, gnaw and put anything he can in his mouth to alleviate the itching/burning sensation in there.

I've also never heard of calcium supplements for teething, and would also recommend a talk with your doctor; adding extra calcium to his diet might effect his iron levels negatively.

Pieces of fruit from the 'fridge were a hit with my son, as were carrot sticks. They were large enough that he could hold them and gnaw on, but not choke upon.

Another option is a clean cloth diaper - soak it in water and tie a small knot in the middle, then place it in the freezer for a half hour to an hour. It's another texture he can experiment on, but not injure himself with.

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Carrot sticks only work after the first teeth appear, right? The frozen cloth knot is a nice idea. –  Torben Gundtofte-Bruun Jul 29 '11 at 10:08
    
Torben, the carrot sticks work great actually. I have tried cucumber as well :) –  lostInTransit Jul 29 '11 at 11:01
    
You can definitely injure yourself on ice, so make sure the frozen cloth is only cold, not frozen solid. I'd put it in a cold fridge instead. –  Lennart Regebro Jul 30 '11 at 8:17

This is not medical advice, I am not a doctor.

Children from 6 months to 5 years might need a supplement of vitamins A, C, and D.

http://www.nhs.uk/Planners/birthtofive/Pages/Vitamins.aspx

Vitamin D helps with calcium absorption.

Here's a document that gives recommended daily amounts for calcium (in different age ranges) and then gives a list of calcium rich foods. This may be preferable to giving a supplement.

http://www.royalsurrey.nhs.uk/adx/aspx/adxGetMedia.aspx?DocID=1233,1139,5,1,Documents&MediaID=706931a4-3611-4e03-85bb-f1d0f9efdb9e&Filename=Calcium+for+Infants+and+Children+09101331_066w.pdf

At 9 months he's not a late teether yet! I think that after 13 months he'll become a late teether.

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doc not opening –  Ali Apr 11 at 10:57

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