Take the 2-minute tour ×
Parenting Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for parents, grandparents, nannies and others with a parenting role. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The WHO growth standards are applicable worldwide and designed to suit all ethnic groups, but given that genetics play an important part in stature, can parents of Asian children rely on different growth charts that are specific to the growth patterns of Asian kids? In particular, does anyone know of existing growth standards (with percentiles) for Chinese or Japanese children?

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Certainly. The genes matter. If I compare my kid's growth with American's I'll never consider my kid as a normal kid in weight and height! There is where the role of local government comes. And, we should follow this because when they prepare such charts, they take utmost care and derive data from a lot of research and zillions of evidences.

I'd rather recommend going for a regional kid's growth charge i.e. country-wise as compared to the growth chart for continents. That's because Asia is too big! The growth that you see in India is certainly different than in China/Japan. This includes the life expectancy, weight, height or things the like.

I found it for you.

enter image description here

enter image description here

Very useful PDF download here.

I'm not sure about Japanese growth chart as I could not find it. However, I recommend asking this on any local government website (or local search engine for that sake? Say Baidu?) and you'll get the Japanese one also.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, great find! It's old, though, so I wonder if different ones can be found in China. It would be great to compile a directory of growth charts per country/region and even per medical condition (for example there are specific charts for preterm babies and Down syndrome). –  Clafou Apr 10 at 9:53
    
Be mindful that some governments release data they want the populace to follow, not necessarily based on data. Well researched and academically-reviewed data is more reliable. Governments aren't authorities on much. –  Jeremy Miller Apr 12 at 3:07
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.